North Carolina State University

3-D docking pose of potential GalU inhibitor Courtesy North Carolina State University

Researchers from North Carolina State University have pinpointed new compounds that may be effective in containing the virulence of Listeria, a bacterium that can cause severe food poisoning and death.

News of the discovery comes during an ongoing…

The change of seasons can bring a chance of snow for some and a chance of viruses for even more. Sharing time, meals and close spaces from Thanksgiving weekend through New Year’s Day all too often means sharing bugs, which don’t discriminate.

Although they’re the last living creatures on any invitation list, when pathogens make…

Behavior researchers long ago recognized there is often a big difference between what people say they will do, and what they actually do. The best way to find the truth is to adopt observational research methods, watching for what actually happens.

cookingtherometer_406x250The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has announced a…

Editor’s note: Ben Chapman, a food safety researcher and holiday meal enthusiast, originally published this column in the North Carolina State University News. 

To view the full Thanksgiving food safety video, click on the image.
To view the full Thanksgiving food safety video, click on the image.

As a Canadian in the U.S., I’ve fully embraced the holiday season that runs from…

As American consumers become increasingly concerned about the quality of their food, there’s been an enhanced focus on food safety in the academic and employment fields. Programs leading to degrees and certifications in food safety are growing, along with jobs handling quality assurance in the food industry and auditing producers for compliance with the Food…

Food-donations_406x250The food safety of food pantries is a fairly new arena for researchers, but with 14 percent of American households insecure about food at some point during 2014, it’s drawing more attention. The latest bit of research on the subject finds that there is “much room for improvement,” particularly when it comes to recalls. The…

New research suggests that most consumers will accept nanotechnology or genetic modification technology in their food if it will enhance nutrition or improve safety. Researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of Minnesota conducted a nationally representative survey of 1,117 U.S. consumers. It asked about their willingness to purchase genetically modified (GM) food…

(This article by Ellen Thomas, a Ph.D. candidate in Food Science at North Carolina State University, and Ben Chapman, Ph.D., an associate professor and food safety specialist at NCSU, was published in the October/November 2014 issue of Food Safety magazine and is reposted here with permission.) Land-grant universities in the United States were established with…