The FDA has been investigating certain supplements since September and has found some tejocote root products to be substituted with toxic yellow oleander, which can cause serious reactions and death.

Most of the products are sold online. As of April 4, the Food and Drug Administration had received reports of “adverse events” from people who ingested products labeled as tejocote root. At least one serious event has been reported in relation to Green ELV Nutrition brand Elv Control Herbal Supplement capsules. The capsules have been added to the FDA’s list of products that have been found to have toxic yellow

Continue Reading FDA issues warning about toxic yellow oleander in tejocote root products

Norovirus, the highly contagious illness that causes vomiting and diarrhea, has surged in the Northeast region of the United States in the past few weeks, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CDC statistics show that food is the most common transmission vehicle for noroviruses.

While surveillance data show an increase in positive test results nationwide—as is typical for norovirus during the winter months—northeastern states have been hit especially hard, with a three-week average of 13.7 percent for positive norovirus tests. Those tests have held above a 10 percent positive rate since December 2023.

Continue Reading Norovirus sweeps the country; CDC says Northeast particularly hard hit

With severe weather predicted across the United States, public health officials are urging consumers to practice good food safety during power outages.

One important thing to remember is that placing perishable food outside in snow  does not provide the proper cooling to keep food safe.

The Food and Drug Administration also lists the following food safety measures for those experiencing power outages.

Be Prepared and Plan Ahead

Use a refrigerator and freezer thermometer, and check it regularly to ensure that the refrigerator temperature is at or below 40 degrees F and the freezer is at or below 0 degrees F.

Continue Reading Power outages can bring food safety challenges; follow these tips

With severe weather across the United States, public health officials are urging consumers to practice good food safety during power outages.

One important thing to remember is that placing perishable food outside in snow does not provide the proper cooling to keep food safe.

The Food and Drug Administration also lists the following food safety measures for those experiencing power outages.

Be Prepared and Plan Ahead

  • Plan
  • Continue Reading Follow these tips to keep food safe during power outages

    This may be hard to swallow, but the drinking bottle that you are dutifully carrying around with you all day to stay properly hydrated may be delivering more than water into your body. 

    The most commonly used plastic water bottle is made of polyethylene terephthalate, or PET, which is indicated on the bottle with a stamp of the number 1 surrounded by arrows. This plastic is considered safe to use for water. But is it?  

    While some chemical residues from the production process contaminate all plastic containers and can be released into the contained food or drink, PET plastic water

    Continue Reading The dark effects of the sun on plastic drinking bottles

    The FDA has released its final food safety guidance for producers of sprouts, a food that has been linked to several outbreaks in recent years.

    The document details recommendations on how sprout operators can comply with the sprout portion of the 2011 Food Safety Modernization Act, which establishes science-based standards for safe produce production and harvest.

    Topics covered in the final guidance on sprout production include cleaning, sanitization, use of agricultural water, seeds for sprouting, environmental monitoring, and recordkeeping. 

    The Food and Drug Administration has also released a revised draft of a second guidance document that includes a section on

    Continue Reading FDA publishes rule for production of sprouts

    While West Virginia is suffering from devastating flooding, Florida, Georgia, and the southeast coast are dealing with Hurricane Idalia and its aftermath. In emergency situations like this, it’s important to remember vital food safety practices to keep a bad situation from getting worse.

    Hurricane Idalia looms over florida
    As Hurricane Idalia intensified moves through Florida and up the U.S. coast, residents are on high alert.

    Tropical Storm Idalia rapidly transformed into a Category 3 hurricane. Life-threatening storm surges and dangerous winds have swept through various parts of Florida and forecasters predict it will continue up the coast.

    West Virginia suffers

    Continue Reading Food Safety Tips for Hurricane and Flooding Safety

    As the school year kicks off with a whirlwind of emotions and activities, the race to balance new routines and responsibilities often leads to moments of absentmindedness. Amidst the chaos, it’s easy to overlook a critical aspect: ensuring the safety of the meals your children carry to school. Neglecting food safety measures can have serious consequences, exposing students to the risk of foodborne illnesses. To alleviate these worries, government experts with FoodSafety.gov have offered a straightforward and effective four-step approach to back-to-school meal prep that guarantees both convenience and safety.

    1. Weekly Menu Planning and Grocery Shopping
    The process, as

    Continue Reading Back-to-school food safety tips: Ensuring healthy and safe lunches for students

    Parents and caregivers should take extra precautions when preparing and packing a school lunch. Flunking in food safety is not an option, especially when children are most vulnerable to foodborne illness.

    The USDA has some tips for parents and caregivers to help them make the food safety honor roll.

    Keep Cold Foods Cold and Hot Foods Hot

    • Cold Foods: USDA recommends using insulated lunch boxes to keep food safe. Paper bags are risky because they don’t allow for proper food cooling. Always use at least two cold sources, like frozen gel packs, juice boxes, or water bottles, to keep
    Continue Reading USDA’s food safety precautions for preparing and packing a school lunch

    Fiddleheads, the curled, edible shoots of the ostrich fern, are a seasonal delicacy harvested in many parts of the Northern United States and Canada. Other types of ferns, like foxglove and bracken ferns, are not safe to eat because they may be toxic or carcinogenic.

    However, a number of outbreaks of foodborne illness from eating raw or undercooked fiddleheads have been reported in the United States and Canada since 1994. Proper handling and thorough cooking of fiddleheads can reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

    Tips for safe consumption of fiddleheads:

    Cleaning Fresh Fiddleheads
    Before cooking fiddleheads, it is important to

    Continue Reading Food safety for fiddleheads: Tips for safe consumption