A collaboration between two companies has developed a device for detecting radiation-contamination food. After an earthquake and tsunami damaged Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant in 2011 and caused a significant leak of radioactive material, RIKEN Global Research Cluster and G-Tech began researching methods for detecting radioactive cesium in food. Radiation-detection_406x250 The detector system…

A local farming official in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, said Monday that rice grown in the area of the 2011 nuclear disaster has passed that country’s radiation checks. Small amounts of the region’s approximately 360,000-ton rice harvest did not pass in 2012 or 2013 and had to be destroyed. Tsuneaki Oonami said that nearly the entire…

Totally on their own, E. coli bacteria have shown that they can evolve to a point where they are resistant to antibiotic drugs. Now some of the nation’s top scientists are showing how E. coli bacteria can resist ionizing radiation. They are taking advantage of the bacteria’s built-in ability to evolve when they encounter hostilities…

Except for some spinach, turnips and white radishes with high radiation levels caught early on by Hong Kong, “hot” food has not entered the market since last March’s earthquake and tsunami damaged a nuclear plant in Japan.

But recently trace amounts of cesium-137 and cesium-134 were found in batches of “Meiji Step” baby milk powder, …

The Japanese government tried to explain Wednesday how beef containing trace levels of radioactive cesium ended up reaching stores or consumers in several prefectures, and promised to step up inspections to prevent another such incident.

News reports said cows raised at a farm near the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant likely had eaten rice…

Governments are stepping up scrutiny of domestic food and water supplies as radioactive material spreads from the country’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Wednesday that it was increasing its nationwide monitoring of milk, precipitation, drinking water and other potential sources of nuclear exposure.

So far, a sample of milk …

We’ve been asking a lot of questions about radiation during the past two weeks because there is a lot of interest in the subject.  

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This past week we’ve seen the United States, through the Food and Drug Administration, and other countries halt food shipments from some areas of Japan. The areas put off-limit surround …

Those leafy greens from California filling America’s salad bowls are safe to eat, so stop worrying about this radiation from Japan business–OK?

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That pretty much says it. At the Irvine-based Western Growers and Produce Marketing Association, spokeswoman Wendy Fink-Weber says there is “no threat” to California produce from radiation in Japan.

She can point to …

Japanese milk and spinach just do not factor much in the U.S. food supply, but what about radioactive fish?

Five billion pounds of seafood are imported annually to the U.S. without much inspection.

But we should not worry for two reasons about Japan’s fish exports (mostly Pacific saury, chum salmon, mackerel, tuna, and scallops), U.S. …