Photo of Marion Nestle

Marion Nestle is Paulette Goddard Professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health (the department she chaired from 1988-2003) and Professor of Sociology at New York University. Her degrees include a Ph.D. in molecular biology and an M.P.H. in public health nutrition, both from the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health (2002, paperback 2003) and Safe Food: Bacteria, Biotechnology, and Bioterrorism (2003, paperback 2004), both from University of California Press. Her book, What to Eat, published by North Point Press/ Farrar, Straus & Giroux (2006, paperback 2007), was named as one of Amazon.Com's top ten books of 2006 (Health, Mind, and Body) , and a "Must Read" by Eating Well magazine. Her most recent book is Pet Food Politics: The Chihuahua in the Coal Mine, published by University of California Press in 2008. Her forthcoming book, co-authored with Malden Nesheim, is Feed Your Pet Right (Free Press/Simon & Schuster, May 2010).

(This blog post by Dr. Marion Nestle was published June 6, 2014, on Food Politics and is republished here with her permission.) Understanding why school nutritionists want to scrap USDA’s nutrition standards takes some effort. The question: Why is the School Nutrition Association (SNA) — the organization that represents the interests of “lunch ladies” —…

(This blog post was originally published Jan. 15, 2014, on Food Politics.) By an act of Congress, dietary supplements are regulated less strictly than conventional foods, so much so that some beverage manufacturers would much prefer to have their products labeled as dietary supplements than foods – energy shots, for example. Under the law,…

I am a strong supporter of labeling GMO foods. Consumers have the right to know. That’s enough of a reason to support California’s Prop. 37. There is no need to muddy the waters with difficult-to-interpret science. My e-mail inbox was flooded with messages yesterday about the new long-term rat study reporting that both GMO corn…

Ordinarily I find government plans of this type to be soporific but this one is especially well written and well thought out (with some caveats).

grocery-recalls-iphone.jpg

The report is a statement of FDA commitment to what it is going to do in the next four years in food areas that affect people and animals.  It includes …

Bacterial contamination of meat is an ongoing problem and everyone wishes for an easy fix–one that does not require meat producers and packers to prevent contamination.

Irradiation works, but raises feasibility and other concerns.

How about electrocution?

Food Production Daily reports that hitting meat with electrical current reduces toxic E. coli O157:H7 on meat surfaces …