Photo of Jill Richardson

Jill Richardson's roots as a food activist began when she graduated college. Since then, Jill has embarked on a journey that took her across America and united her with a growing movement of sustainable food activists. The sustainable food movement is unlike other, related movements because it views the food system as a whole and seeks holistic solutions in which everybody wins together (rather than advocating for a single issue like hunger, environmentalism, or animal rights without regard to the rest of the food system). Because food is not yet widely viewed as a political issue and because would-be food activists do not have a readily available source of information about current political issues that they can take action on, Jill founded a blog called La Vida Locavore and she wrote Recipe for America: Why Our Food System is Broken and What We Can Do to Fix It. The book aims to give readers an overview of the problems in our solution, plus a vision of what a sustainable food system would look like from the soil on up, and then provide specific policy recommendations that are timely and possible to achieve now. Because policies and politics change every day, Jill updates her blog frequently, telling readers how they can get involved in the latest issues, including those described in the book (as well as new issues that arose after her book's publication). Recipe for America is Jill's first book. She lives with her three cats in San Diego, CA.

“There’s a live animal caught in a poacher’s snare!” yelled Isaac Maina as he took off running through the bush to reach it. Maina leads the African Network for Animal Welfare’s monthly “desnaring” operations, removing snares in areas of Kenya where poaching is rampant. Guns are illegal for most people in Kenya, so poachers seeking…

Editor’s note: If you had a magic wand, how would you conjure up sustainable and safe ways to feed the world?  We asked several people to consider the possibilities. Here is the first response, from contributor Jill Richardson of “La Vida Locavore”:

What would I do if I were the magic Food Safety Fairy?  I …

Are you eating nanofoods? While it might sound like the latest diet trend among anorexics, the term refers to the use of nanotechnology – particles as small as a billionth of a meter – in food. And there’s a chance that you’re already eating them.

Nanofoods fall into four categories. First, and most obviously, there’s …

Using sewage sludge – one of two end products from any wastewater treatment plant (the other is effluent) – as fertilizer on food crops is a hotly debated food safety issue, but only among a very small group of people.  Most likely, the majority of Americans who are even aware of the issue actually work …

Editor’s Note:  We’ve asked Jill Richardson, author of “Recipe for America: Why Our Food System is Broken and What We Can Do to Fix It”  for a behind-the-scenes analysis of the legislative battle over food safety legislation that remains alive in the current Congress.

Over the past year and a half, the rumors have made…

When the FDA announced just before Labor Day that it found the genetically engineered AquAdvantage salmon safe, news headlines and even Alaska Senator Mark Begich called it a “frankenfish.” A closer look at AquAdvantage makes it seem unlikely that Mary Shelley could have ever dreamed up anything as wild as the fast-growing GE salmon. Even …

As I flew home Friday, I realized the irony of the shirt I was wearing. It said “Put a trial lawyer out of business. Pass food safety reform BEFORE Thanksgiving.” Oops. Guess that didn’t happen. Then again, I don’t think that even the trial lawyer in question (Bill Marler) believed it would happen.…