Photo of Bruce Clark

Bruce Clark is a partner in Marler Clark. In 1993, Bruce became involved in foodborne illness litigation as an attorney for Jack in the Box restaurants in its E. coli O157:H7 personal injury litigation. The Jack in the Box litigation spanned more than four years and involved more than 100 lawsuits in four states. Since that time, Bruce has been continuously involved in food and waterborne illness litigation involving bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents in settings ranging from large scale outbreaks to individual cases. He has extensive expertise in the medical, microbiological, and epidemiological aspects of foodborne illness cases gleaned from more than a decade of working with leading experts across the country. Bruce frequently speaks to public health groups as well as food industry groups about the realities of foodborne illness litigation and efforts that can help avoid the damage foodborne pathogens inflict.

The issue of whether antibiotics used to treat Shiga toxin-producing E. coli increase the risk of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has been a vexing one.  But beyond E. coli, antibiotic use in general for treatment of infectious gastroenteritis poses conflicting risks and benefits.  Since it is hard for even the most diligent medical practitioner…

The Center for Disease Control’s (CDC’s) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report just published surveillance data on salt consumption among adults in the US:  “Sodium Intake in Adults – United States, 2005-2006.”  Almost all of us are consuming too much.  How much salt is too much?  Very little, more than a teaspoon a day is too…

I am often asked what will be the next big pathogen of concern.  And I respond that I have no idea, except that it is already here just waiting to be recognized.  Indeed, it seems that some of our most noteworthy bugs appear abruptly out of nowhere.  How is that possible?  And if these bugs …

I am not about to jump into the often heated debate over the merits and dangers of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), however I am intrigued by a new study by the National Research Council that finds both benefits and risks in the long-term use of genetically modified crops.[1] Specifically, I note the key role weeds…

I am often asked what foods I avoid because they may carry a risk of contamination with pathogenic organisms.  I have a very short list of foods to avoid on principle based on concerns about the potential for bacterial adulteration.  But I am increasingly concerned about the general quality of the American diet as a…

Americans are rightly concerned about the wide variety of pathogens that regularly turn up in foods common to most diets.  Who wouldn’t appropriately worry about an array of bugs that can induce serious short-term and even long-term health impacts from a wide spectrum of what Americans eat on a regular basis?  But the bigger worry …

When talking about the bugs that cause foodborne illness most people focus on familiar culprits like E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Campylobacter, Listeria, and Staph aureus.  But the real heavyweight of foodborne illness germs is not a bacterium at all.   It is a virus and it is far and away the most common cause of foodborne …