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CDC: Five MN Salmonella Cases Linked to Aspen Foods Chicken Entrées

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), several states, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) are currently investigating two separate outbreaks of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, stuffed chicken entrees.

The two outbreaks are caused by different strains of Salmonella Enteritidis, CDC stated in an update issued Tuesday, Sept. 29.

At this time, this outbreak has not been connected with an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, stuffed chicken entrees produced by Barber Foods and sold under many different brands.

CDC, the Minnesota Department of Health, and FSIS are investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, stuffed and breaded chicken entrees produced by Aspen Foods.

  • Five people infected with two strains of Salmonella Enteritidis were reported from Minnesota with illness onsets from May to July 2015. Two of these people were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.
  • The five illnesses in Minnesota occurred after people had eaten Antioch Farms brand frozen, raw, stuffed and breaded chicken entrees, which are produced by Aspen Foods.

A list of retail outlets where the previously recalled products were sold can be found here.

Previous coverage follows:

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is alerting consumers that frozen, raw, stuffed and breaded chicken products produced by Aspen Foods, a division of Koch Poultry Company of Chicago, IL, have been confirmed as having the same Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak strain which was part of a July 15, 2015, recall.

chickencordonbleu-iphoneFollowing the July 15 recall, FSIS has been conducting intensified sampling at this establishment to ensure that the hazard responsible for the initial contamination has been controlled by Aspen Foods.

Results from FSIS sampling revealed 12 positive results that match the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis to Aspen Foods products. Three illnesses were epidemiologically linked to the original recall on July 15, 2015. FSIS continues to work with public health partners, including the Minnesota Departments of Health and Agriculture and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, on this ongoing investigation.

FSIS is concerned about all frozen, raw, stuffed and breaded chicken products produced by Aspen Foods between July 30, 2015, and Sept. 17, 2015. The 12 positive samples collected during FSIS’ intensified sampling efforts alerted FSIS to a systemic problem at the establishment. FSIS cannot have confidence in the safety of any products produced after July 30, 2015. In addition to issuing this alert, FSIS has directed its personnel to detain products covered by this alert that they find in commerce because the company has refused to recall the products.

The frozen, raw, stuffed and breaded chicken items may include the following brands and be labeled as “chicken cordon bleu,” “chicken Kiev” or “chicken broccoli and cheese” and bear the establishment number “P-1358” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These products were shipped to retail location and food service locations nationwide.

  • Acclaim
  • Antioch Farms
  • Buckley Farms
  • Centrella Signature
  • Chestnut Farms
  • Family Favorites
  • Kirkwood
  • Koch Foods
  • Market Day
  • Oven Cravers
  • Rose
  • Rosebud Farm
  • Roundy’s
  • Safeway Kitchens
  • Schwan’s
  • Shaner’s
  • Spartan
  • Sysco

These products were labeled with instructions identifying that the product was uncooked (raw) and included cooking instructions for preparation. As stated in the July 15, 2015, Recall Release, some case-patients reported following the cooking instructions on the label and using a food thermometer to confirm that the recommended temperature was achieved. Therefore, FSIS advises consumers not to eat these products.

Special attention should be paid by the food service industry and food handlers. Using a food thermometer to properly cook these products will not protect the health of the consuming public.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after exposure to the organism. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase. FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ freezers. Although the products included in this alert may appear to be cooked, this product is in fact uncooked (raw) and should be handled carefully to avoid cross-contamination in the kitchen.

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