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Salmonella Test Prompts Jonathan’s Sprouts Recall

Less than a month after it received a warning letter from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) about health claims it was making, Jonathan Sprouts has recalled its conventionally grown alfalfa sprout products.

The 35-year-old Rochester, MA-based sprout farm said the recall was based on routine sampling by the USDA Microbiological Data Program that indicated possible Salmonella contamination.

No illnesses have yet been reported.  The recall does not include any of the company’s organic products.

The recall list includes all of Jonathan’s conventionally grown sprouts in square plastic containers with sell-by dates of April 23, including:

  • Jonathan’s 4oz Alfalfa Sprouts

  • Jonathan’s 4oz Alfalfa with Radish Sprouts

  • Jonathan’s 4oz Gourmet Sprouts

  • Jonathan’s 4oz Alfalfa with Dill Sprouts

  • Jonathan’s 8oz Alfalfa Sprouts


  • Jonathan’s 5 lb Bulk Alfalfa in waxed 18″x11″ cardboard cartons – code 397 

The products were distributed in New York, New England, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware.  They are sold at the following retail stores: A&P, Grand Union, Stop & Shop, Shaws, Hannaford, Donnelans, Foodmaster, Truccis, Roche Brothers.

Consumers who purchased the recalled products are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. For more information contact the company at 508-763-2577.

The FDA, in a March 24 warning letter, accused Jonathan’s of making unauthorized health and nutrient claims about sprouts.

Salmonella can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections, especially in young children; frail or elderly people, or in those with weakened immune systems. Symptoms of infection include fever, possibility bloody diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

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