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Chicken Soup Goes on Recall List

The recall of Salmonella-contaminated hydrolyzed vegetable protein has now struck one of the staples of people trying to recover from winter illnesses–chicken soup.

Las Vegas-based Basic Food Flavors Inc. has a nationwide recall out for its vegetable protein, and that’s caused Castella Imports of Hauppauge, NY to in turn recall its Castella Chicken Soup Base.

The Chicken Soup Base was made using hydrolyzed vegetable protein manufactured by Basic Food Flavors.

Castella Chicken Soup Base is distributed nationwide to food service establishments (25 lbs. product) and retail stores (1 lb. product).

Castella Chicken Soup Base 1 lb. is packaged in an opaque plastic jar with a white cap, a gold seal, a light yellow label, and UPC code 7 50144 33000 5. The recalled lots are: 0912039918, 1001121915, 1002013074, and 1002194266. The expiration dates for the lots affected are 12-3-2010 through 2-28-2011.

Castella Chicken Soup Base 25 lb. is packed in an all white bucket, a yellow label, and UPC code 7 501144 3320 9. The recalled lots are: 0911259508, 0911259508A, 0912150738, 0912180973, 0912211087, 1001192342, 1001282925, 1002194267. The expiration dates for the lots affected are 11-25-2010 through 2-28-2011.

No illnesses have been associated with the chicken soup recall.

Consumers that have the product may return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact Castella Imports at 631-231-5500, Monday through Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

Salmonella is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections, especially in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.

Symptoms of Salmonella infections include fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, and vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

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