Header graphic for print

Food Safety News

Breaking news for everyone's consumption

Salmonella Sprouts Recall Expands Due to Listeria Concern

A sprouts grower that recalled alfalfa sprouts last month because of a positive Salmonella test is now pulling more varieties off the market because of Listeria concerns.

In a news release this weekend, Texas-based Green Valley Food Corp. said it is recalling approximately 35,159 cases of sprouts because several random samples tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes.

There have been no “confirmed illnesses” associated with the sprouts, according to the company’s recall notice.

broccosprouts-224.jpg

The recall includes the 650 cases of alfalfa sprouts recalled Dec. 23 and 24, as well as sprouts that have use-by dates from Dec. 22, 2011 to Jan. 17, 2012.  Customers who received any of the sprouts from Dec. 7, 2011 to Jan. 1, 2012 are affected by the recall, the company said.

The sprouts were distributed in Texas to grocery store distribution centers and food service customers.

The recall is for:

– “Let’s Grow Healthy Together!” Alfalfa Sprouts 5 oz. plastic 2 piece containers with the UPC number 714722228818

– “Let”s Grow Healthy Together!” Spicy Sprouts 5 oz. plastic 2 piece containers with the UPC number 714722229914

– “Alfalfa Sprouts 4oz. plastic security sealed clamshell UPC number 815098001088

– “Green Valley Food Corp.” Onion Sprouts” 4oz. plastic security sealed clamshell UPC number 815098002054

– “Let’s Grow Healthy Together!” Sunflower Greens 5 oz. plastic 2 piece containers with the UPC number 714722206069

– “Let’s Grow Healthy Together!” Clover Sprouts 5 oz. plastic 2 piece containers with the UPC number 714722225510

– “Let’s Grow Healthy Together!” Onion Sprouts 2 oz. plastic 2 piece containers with the UPC number 714722227712

– “Let’s Grow Healthy Together!” Zesty Sprouts 5 oz. plastic 2 piece containers with the UPC number 714722221116

– “Let’s Grow Healthy Together!” Organic Wheat Grass 6oz. plastic 2 piece containers with the UPC number 714722608122

– “Let’s Grow Healthy Together!” Mung Bean Sprouts 8oz. red polypropylene bag with the UPC number 714722208087

– “Let’s Grow Healthy Together!” Mung Bean Sprouts 8oz. clear polypropylene bag with the UPC number 815098001071

– “Let’s Grow Healthy Together!” Mung Bean Sprouts 16 oz. clear polypropylene bag with a green label, the UPC number 714722208162

– “Green Valley Food Corp.” Spicy Sprouts 4 oz. plastic security sealed clamshell containers with the UPC number 815098002023

– “Green Valley Food Corp.” Snow Pea Shoots 3 oz. plastic security sealed clamshell containers with the UPC number 714722106062

– “Green Valley Food Corp.” Organic Wheatgrass 4 oz. plastic security sealed clamshell containers with UPC number 714722608122

– “Green Valley Food Corp.” Daikon Sprouts 3 oz. plastic security sealed clamshell containers with UPC number 714722206076

– “Broccosprouts” Sandwich Blend 4 oz. plastic security sealed clamshell containers with UPC number 815098000289

– “Broccosprouts” Salad Blend 4 oz. plastic security sealed clamshell containers with UPC number 815098000265

– “Broccosprouts” Deli Blend 4 oz. plastic security sealed clamshell containers with the UPC number 815098000272

– “Broccosprouts” Broccoli Sprouts 4 oz. plastic security sealed clamshell containers with UPC number 815098000258

To see all the product labels go here.

Direct customers will be receiving a letter asking for the quantities theywere shipped and their whereabouts, the company’s news release stated. Consumers who purchased these sprouts at their local grocery store are being advised to dispose of them immediately.

For more information contact Green Valley Food Corp. at 214-939-3900 Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday from 6 a.m. to noon, or via email at info@greenvalleyfood.com.

Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

© Food Safety News
  • jmunsell

    The detection of listeria in sprouts reminds me of the recent listeria-laced canteloupe recall. Although several suggestions for canteloupe production improvements resulted from the Colorado-based recall, I’ve yet to see solid facts which revealed the SOURCE of listeria.
    I respectfully suggest that until we realize how listeria gets into the fields which grow sprouts and canteloupe, or into processing equipment, we are facing the likelihood of future outbreaks.
    An example in another area of food production: E.coli and Salmonella bacteria emanate from animals’ intestines, and of course proliferate on manure-covered hides. Therefore, sanitary dressing procedures on kill floors are mandatory and essential if we desire to reduce illnesses from these two enteric bacteria. Well, listeria are NOT enteric bacteria, so where does the bug originate?
    The recall of unsafe produce is certainly a step in the right direction. However, if we want to prevent future illnesses and recalls, more study must be put into determining the SOURCE of listeria, which would then enable us to implement truly meaningful corrective actions. This would constitue Prevention, rather than after-the-fact reaction.
    John Munsell

  • Art Davis

    Reading the recall notices from this incident I suspect the original Salmonella finding was in a sample of sprouts but the LM findings were the result of swabs taken in the producing facility as part of a followup to the original issue. The LM notice is several days after the Salmonella notice and specifies “Several positives” which seems more likely as a result of a swab survey of the producing environment than just additional product sampling. This sort of issue has occurred in at least one other sprouting facility within the last few years.

  • John Munsell

    The detection of listeria in sprouts reminds me of the recent listeria-laced canteloupe recall. Although several suggestions for canteloupe production improvements resulted from the Colorado-based recall, I’ve yet to see solid facts which revealed the SOURCE of listeria.
    I respectfully suggest that until we realize how listeria gets into the fields which grow sprouts and canteloupe, or into processing equipment, we are facing the likelihood of future outbreaks.
    An example in another area of food production: E.coli and Salmonella bacteria emanate from animals’ intestines, and of course proliferate on manure-covered hides. Therefore, sanitary dressing procedures on kill floors are mandatory and essential if we desire to reduce illnesses from these two enteric bacteria. Well, listeria are NOT enteric bacteria, so where does the bug originate?
    The recall of unsafe produce is certainly a step in the right direction. However, if we want to prevent future illnesses and recalls, more study must be put into determining the SOURCE of listeria, which would then enable us to implement truly meaningful corrective actions. This would constitue Prevention, rather than after-the-fact reaction.
    John Munsell

  • Rick Choo

    One thing I don’t usderstand, This company’s web site saying they are doing “Hold and Release program”. It means they are doing test on product before ship right? Then How that contaminated products(salmonella) were found by customer? They were not doing test? or contaminated in a Truck???

  • So scary! This is exactly why I grow my own sprouts – if people knew how easy they were to grow they wouldn’t have to rely on supermarkets to buy them. Plus, it’s just plain scary how genetically mutated our foods have become today!!