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J&D Recall Expands to 18 Other Vegetables, Greens

A Texas produce company that has already recalled some 7,000 cases of Salmonella-tainted cilantro and curly parsley has now recalled 18 other vegetables and leafy greens, all processed on the same packing lines.

little-bear-logo.jpg

J&D Produce Inc. announced Wednesday that the possibility of cross contamination prompted it to also recall arugula, beets, collards, mustard, daikon, dill, kohlrabi, chard, kale, mint, turnips and leeks shipped to 16 states and two Canadian provinces.

“It’s imperative to protect public health, even if that means being overzealous in expanding the scope of the products we’re calling back,” said James Bassetti, president of J&D Produce Inc., in a news release. “We will work closely with regulators, health officials and our customers in bringing back the products.”

All the produce was packed in red, white, and blue waxed cartons under the Little Bear brand. Except for daikon, the individual bunches have a rubber band or a twist tie identified by a flag tag that shows a little bear with a cowboy hat, a red handkerchief and a Texas flag.  The produce went to retail stores and wholesale terminal markets in Washington, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Missouri, Rhode Island, New York, Texas, Ohio, Connecticut, Ohio, Colorado, Illinois and Oklahoma — and the provinces of Ontario and Quebec.

All the produce was packed either on Nov. 30, 2010, or Dec. 6, 2010, which is a clarification from the company’s announcement earlier this week.  The company says most of these  types of greens are typically sold and eaten within about 14 days from their “pack dates”; however, it suggests that if consumers still have any of the produce it should be destroyed or returned to the store where it was purchased for a full refund.

The products being recalled, their PLU/UPC numbers, and the areas where they were distributed are:

CURLY PARSLEY, PLU # 4899, Ontario, Washington. Massachusetts, Quebec, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Missouri, Rhode Island, New York, Texas, Ohio, Connecticut

CILANTRO, PLU #4889, Ontario, Massachusetts, Washington, Quebec, New York, Illinois, Texas, Colorado, Michigan, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Ohio

ARUGULA, PlU #4884, Ontario, Rhode Island, Texas

BEETS, PLU # 4539, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Ontario, Wisconsin, Quebec, Texas, Illinois, Rhode Island

COLLARDS, PLU # 4614, Ontario, Texas, Wisconsin, Quebec, Michigan, Ohio

CURLY MUSTARD, PLU # 4616, Quebec, Texas

DAIKON, does not contain PLU or UPC, Ontario, New York, Texas, Quebec

DILL, PLU # 4891, Ontario, Massachusetts, Quebec, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Texas, New Jersey, Wisconsin

GOLDEN BEETS, PLU # 3273, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Texas

GREEN KOHLRABI, PLU # 4628, Ohio, Ontario, Pennsylvania, Quebec, Wisconsin

GREEN SWISS CHARD, PLU # 4586, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, Ontario, Pennsylvania, Quebec, Rhode Island, Texas

KALE, PLU # 4627, Ontario, Quebec, Texas, Wisconsin, Montreal, Michigan, Illinois, Rhode Island, New York, Ohio, Toronto

LEEK, PLU # 4629 Texas

METHlLEAF, UPC # 664781 10500 4, Ontario, Texas

MINT, PLU # 4896, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Michigan

PARSLEY, PLU # 4901, Ontario, Washington, Quebec, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, New Jersey, Connecticut

RAINBOW CHARD, UPC # 66478140610 1, Illinois, Connecticut

RED SWISS CHARD, PLU # 4587, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Ontario, Quebec, Rhode Island, Texas

TEXAS MUSTARD, PLU # 4618, Oklahoma, Texas

TURNIPS WITH TOPS, PLU #4810, Texas, Michigan

TURNIP TOPS, PLU # 4619, Texas

“We’re all seeing increased inspections by regulators and health officials here in the U.S. and Canada, and that’s positive because it helps further ensure public health,” Bassetti said in a prepared statement.  “We’ve already implemented immediate measures to make sure we minimize the likelihood of this re-occurring.”  For example, the company said that upon learning of the test in Quebec, Bassetti ordered the shut down of all production lines; re-sanitized the production lines; increased manual inspections; and implemented additional product rinse steps.

Bassetti said be has also brought in outside consultants to review and advise the company on additional microbiological sampling and its food safety protocols.

“We have a good track record, but we’ll bring our expectations and standards to even bigger levels,” he said.

For additional information, contact J&D Produce by email at: qa@littlebearproduce.com or by phone at 956-380-0353.

© Food Safety News
  • dangermaus

    Yet another example of food being contaminated at at a large, centralized processing facility that distributes nationally.
    Buy your food from local farmers whenever possible and this is much less likely to happen to you!

  • dangermaus

    I don’t want to sound TOO naive, though… Of course I realize that we all, including the majority of food geeks like myself, will continue to get the bulk of our food, the majority of our calories, etc. from industrial sources into the foreseeable future. Such is the current state of our farming/food production/sale world, unfortunately.
    Of course, the reason for that is the infrastructure for year-round production within a couple hours of all major cities doesn’t exist, and the ideas of building hundreds/thousands of square miles of greenhouses in the Upper Midwest or growing food inside skyscrapers under lights seems too expensive/energy-intensive/comical to take seriously (at least it does now)…
    However, if people keep going to restaurants that advertise from whom they procure their food, and buying local food in other ways, in other words, creating demand, more of that will be made available. It took us a long time for us to start eating the way we do now, and it’ll keep changing over time. It’ll change for the better, but only if consumers demand local, high quality, foods that are as fresh and alive as possible.

  • I called and well…they want me to call back on Monday—I JUST ate a bowl of kale before being told about this and they want me to call back on Monday cause they all took off for the New year—lol—if Im sick Im gonna get ugly lol

  • Doc Mudd

    A very professional response by J&D. They’ve promptly initiated a broad voluntary recall (emphasis on ‘voluntary’) and a issued a credible acknowledgement of the vital importance of consumer safety and the inestimable value of customer confidence. As J&D explained:
    “We’re all seeing increased inspections by regulators and health officials here in the U.S. and Canada, and that’s positive because it helps further ensure public health,” Bassetti said in a prepared statement. “We’ve already implemented immediate measures to make sure we minimize the likelihood of this re-occurring.” For example, the company said that upon learning of the test in Quebec, Bassetti ordered the shut down of all production lines; re-sanitized the production lines; increased manual inspections; and implemented additional product rinse steps.”
    “Bassetti said be has also brought in outside consultants to review and advise the company on additional microbiological sampling and its food safety protocols.”
    “We have a good track record, but we’ll bring our expectations and standards to even bigger levels,” he said.”
    . ******
    That’s exceptional committment to quality and safety.
    Don’t expect your little ‘local’ hobby farmer to step up and take such responsible measures, neither to prevent nor to remedy a potential food safety problem. If the S.510 debate accomplished anything, it certainly helped us ‘know our farmer’ as someone dedicated to dangerous corner-cutting, someone rabidly opposed to food safety and someone fiercely indifferent to consumer welfare…if it impacts their grubby bottom line, that is. From the raw milk dialogue we learn the prefered ‘remedial’ tactic of the incriminated small producer is to ignore, dismiss and deny, deny, deny.
    Buy dubious over-priced stuff from some shady ‘small producer’ and take your chances with your family’s safety. The precept of caveat emptor has been carefully preserved by S.510’s Tester amendment to validate the entitlement of our noisy selfish hobby farm lobby. That’s not in your interest and it’s profoundly inconsiderate of your family’s safety. But that’s the hobby farm agenda – you and I are important to them only so long as we generously hand over our grocery money without a fuss.

  • Southern Tier Farmer

    Doc mudd want all your food to be processed through large govt controlled facilities. Yeah, like the govt has ever been able to do anything successfully.
    We small farmers are aware of the cleanliness of our product and we self police. The larger corporations has many employees that you hope washed their hands before they left the bathroom. That is if they were taught proper hygiene when they came here from whatever country.
    Your local frmers market is the place to be able to get truly fresh and clean food. We don’t have lawyers on payroll to handle potential problems therefore we prefer to ensure we don’t in the first place.
    It appears to me that after reading some of these articles it is the organic farms/processing facilities that have trouble with contamination not the sustainable farms. As far as I am concerned you can keep you animal waste away from my farm.
    I pity Doc Mudd as he is being misled and prefers to be a sheeple being told what to do by govt officials. Trust the govt at your own risk.

  • Doc Mudd

    “Trust the govt at your own risk.”
    Yeah, ’cause it’s the “govt” who will be selling you and your family, at a premium price, authentic farmers market produce smeared with dirt and feces.