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California Finds Lead in Candy

The California Department of Public Health announced this week that liquorice and corn cob candies are being recalled for lead contamination.  Darrell Lea Chocolate Shops Pty. Ltd. of Australia and Richin Trading, Inc. of Alhambra, Calif., both initiated candy recalls after lead was found in their products.  

raspberry-liquorice-candy.pngDarrell Lea Chocolate Ships initiated a recall of its Yogurt coated Soft Eating Raspberry Liquorice because the Health Department tests revealed the candy to contain four times the recommended totally daily exposure level for lead.  

A Health Department press release stated, “A recent [California Department of Public Health] analysis of this liquorice found as much as 0.61 parts per million (micrograms per gram) lead.  Consumers who eat a serving of the candy could absorb up to 24 micrograms of lead.”

The Australian candy manufacturer is partnering with the United States distributor to ensure that the contaminated candies are removed from the market.  

Richin Trading initiated a recall of its Codn Jelly Choice American Sweet Corn Flavour candy after Health Department testing revealed excess levels of lead.  

corn-jelly-candy.pngA Health Department press release announced, “A recent [California Departmen of Public Health] analysis of this candy found as much as 0.12 parts per million (micrograms per gram) of lead. Consumers who eat a serving of the candy could ingest 6 micrograms of lead.”

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have recommended that children under age six should not consume more than 6.0 micrograms of lead each day from all food sources.

Consumers in possession of either brand of candy should discard it immediately. Pregnant women and parents of children who may have consumed this candy should consult their physician or health care provider to determine if medical testing is needed.

Consumers who find this candy for sale are encouraged to call the CDPH Hotline at (800) 495-3232.

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