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Food Safety iPhone Apps: Still Tasty

You probably already use your iPhone to get directions, play music, or look up movie times, but did you know you could use it to help determine when take-out has gone bad? 

iPhone applications have quite a bit to offer on the food front. If you’re in St. Louis and you must know where the closest Filipino restaurant is, iWant, Urban Spoon, or Yelp applications can help you in a jiffy. You can also use iPhone apps to find an open table at a nearby restaurant, track calories and ingredients, or calculate your tip. 

As more stories emerge about the complexities and risks of the globalizing and highly-processed food supply, more consumers are looking for ways to get information about the food on their plates. In the iPhone app marketplace there are a couple of promising apps to  meet this growing demand. 

A Guide to Food Safety iPhone Applications: Today’s Featured App: Still Tasty

Here are Food Safety News’ must-see food safety apps: Breadcrumbs, HarvestMark, Food Watch New York, Locavore, Still Tasty, and Good Guide. We’ll be featuring each one over the coming days.

Still Tasty: The Ultimate Shelf Life Guide

Still Tasty, the popular website dedicated to helping consumers know whether their perishable food item is still tasty and safe, has launched an excellent app to accompany the site.

The Still Tasty iPhone app–which will only set you back $1.99–gives you an estimate of how long specific foods will last under certain conditions and gives advice on how to store food so it will last.

The app will also let you set expiration alerts for food items and allows you to create shopping lists for when you need to replace food gone bad.

Both the site and the app base their estimates and recommendations primarily on research from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as the food industry.

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Photo courtesy of Serious Eats.

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