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More Aflatoxin-Related Dog Food Recalls Revealed

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration posted two dog food recall notices on its website Wednesday, including one dated Dec. 12 and an “updated” alert dated Dec. 14, more than two weeks ago.

Both recalls of dry dog food were the result of elevated levels of aflatoxin, caused by fungus on grains such as corn that in significant quantities can cause liver damage in pets. These recalls are apparently related to the Dec. 7 announcement by manufacturer Cargill Animal Nutrition that it was pulling dry dog food off the market because of excess amounts of aflatoxin.

Aflatoxin, which cannot exceed 20 parts per billion under FDA standards, has been found in levels above that in dog food produced at Cargill’s plant in LeCompte, LA and in Iams puppy food manufactured by Proctor and Gamble in Henderson, N.C. Advanced Animal Nutrition recalled its Dog Power food, also for elevated aflatoxins.

All the companies have said that, to date, no illnesses or adverse affects have been reported in connection with the recalled dog food, but did not explain why dog food was on the market for more than a year before it was tested for aflatoxins.

O’Neal’s Feeders Supply of DeRidder, LA, said it has recalled dry Arrow Brand dog food  manufactured over an entire year — between Dec. 1, 2010, and Dec. 1, 2011 – because it contains corn detected to have higher than acceptable levels of aflatoxin.

O’Neals said the recall applies only to dog food distributed in Louisiana and Texas with packaging date codes lot numbers 4K0341 through 4K0365 and 04K1001 through 4K1325.

It said retailers have already been instructed to remove the following affected brands and products from store shelves:

 –  ARROWBRAND 21% Dog Chunks SKU #807 40 lb. bag 

  — ARROWBRAND Super Proeaux Dog Food SKU #812 40 lb. bag 

  — ARROWBRAND Professional Formula Dog Food SKU #814 50 lb. bag 

Consumers may return the recalled dog food – in opened or unopened packages – to the place of purchase for a full refund. For more information contact 800-256-2769 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Petrus Feed and Seed Stores, in what was described as an updated alert,  said it has recalled its dry dog food – 21% Protein Dog Food in 40 lb Petrus Feed bags because the product was manufactured with corn that tested above acceptable levels for aflatoxin.

The company said the affected products were manufactured by Cargill in LeCompte, LA between Dec. 1, 2010 and Dec. 1, 2011.

The recall is only for 21% Dog Food, packaged in 40 lb. Petrus Feed bags, with the  packaging date codes (lot numbers) 4K1011 through 4K1307. Updated lot numbers are 4K1011 through 4K1335. The affected dry dog food was distributed in Petrus Feed and Seed in Alexandria, LA.

Consumers may return the recalled dog food  - whether in opened or unopened packages – to their place of purchase for a full refund. For more information contact 318-443-2259, Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday, 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Both companies advised that pets that have consumed any of the recalled products and exhibit symptoms of illness including sluggishness or lethargy combined with a reluctance to eat, vomiting, yellowish tint to the eyes or gums, or diarrhea should be seen by a veterinarian.

© Food Safety News
  • Minkpuppy

    I tend to complain a lot about paying more for corn-free dog food for my lab mix pup due to his sensitive stomach. I need to stop doing that–it will probably save him from aflatoxin someday.

  • http://themoversinlosangeles.com Emily Wright

    i also have a dog with a sensitive stomach, i don’t mind paying the price for the corn free dog food. i don’t want my pup to get aflatoxin.

  • http://www.howtomakedogfood.org How to make dog food

    Cargill says they have not received any reports of dogs getting sick from River Run or Marksman dog food, the two brands being recalled, but they are making sure it doesn’t happen by pulling them from shelves.

  • Colleen A. Bridgman

    Feed your pets human grade foods and don’t forget about calcium. People throw away perfectly good table scrapes (YES, I said table scrapes)that is of higher quality and better nutritional value and then buy CRAP labeled as “premium” that is making their beloved pet sick all because it is more convienent. Feed your pets healthy table scrapes such as vegetables, whole grains and regulated animal protein. Trust me, most of the regulations on ‘our’ meat industries are nothing to be proud of but certainly much better then animal feed.

  • http://www.naturesnibbles.com Chris

    Pet food DOES NOT need corn! Or wheat, soy and especially any by-product! Making the food yourself is THE best one can do for their pets, but because of money, time and limited space in refrig./freezers it’s sometime not feasible. Raw food, whether it be frozen, dehydrated or freeze dried is the next best thing. There are many local and nationwide companies that make great raw meals. If money is an issue(raw meals can be expensive), then feeding the best canned and dry all natural foods is best. If you’re looking for cheap pet food, both in price and quality, you will definitely pay for it later in terms of vet bills, medication, etc. Bottom line; read the ingredients! proteins should be the first ingredient, then if it contains grain(s), be sure they are brown rice, oatmeal, barley, oats. No wheat, no soy no corn!
    http://www.naturesnibbles.com for more info.

  • Mica

    My two year old chihuahua died three days after I fed her five chunks of beef from a can I bought of Iams. Her symptoms were: vomiting, lethargic and later orange color urine. I took her and the food to the vet the next day and advised my vet I thought she had food piosoning but she said that Iams was a good company and perhaps the food was just too rich for her. I tossed the food and the can away and after she treated my dog with fluids and shots, I took her home. But she got worse during the night and the following day I took her back to the vet. I left her in her care, but she died that night.
    Could there be another explenation? Perhaps. But if you look up the food recall duing 2007 on Cornell University Vet site, you will see that the symptoms were typical of aflatoxin piosoning. I tried to have samples of her liver sent to a lab but my vet said there were no labs in NYC that could handle it. Was it the food??? Maybe, maybe not. I wish I knew for sure!

  • JoAnn

    Feed your dog people food then you know what they are eating. Make sure it is organic.

  • http://www.homemadedogfoodrecipesguide.com Homemade Dog Food Recipes

    Feed your pets human grade foods and don’t forget about calcium. People throw away perfectly good table scrapes (YES, I said table scrapes)that is of higher quality and better nutritional value and then buy CRAP labeled as “premium” that is making their beloved pet sick all because it is more convienent.
    Making the food yourself is THE best one can do for their pets, but because of money, time and limited space in refrig./freezers it’s sometime not feasible.