Tests positive for Salmonella triggered two recalls this weekend by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)  The first real is for  Halawa Pistachio Extra and the second is for Sesame seeds.   Both are for microbial contamination from Salmonella  and the public is warned not to consume the recalled products.

Recalled Halawa Pistachio Products:

Brand Product Size UPC Codes
AlBurj (Arabic characters only) Halawa Pistachio Extra (Arabic characters only) 400 g 6 217000 020219
  • P: 04/2021
  • E: 03/2022
  • P: 05/2021
  • E: 04/2022
AlBurj (Arabic characters only) Halawa Pistachio Extra (Arabic characters only) 800 g 6 217000 020677
  • P: 05/2021
  • E: 04/2022

Fandi Import Export Ltd. is recalling AlBurj brand Halawa Pistachio Extra from the marketplace due to possible Salmonella contamination. The recalled products have been sold in Alberta. There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated food recall warnings. The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing the recalled products from the marketplace.

Recalled Sesame Seed Products:

Brand Product Size UPC Codes Additional Information
None Sesame seeds white org bulk Variable Starts with 2 72125 All units sold from August 11, 2021 to November 16, 2021, inclusively Sold at Amaranth Whole Foods Market The Enjoy Centre, 101 Riel Dr., St. Albert, AB
None Sesame seeds white org bulk Variable Starts with 0 298569 Packed OCT-19-21 Sold at Amaranth 4th Street Market, 1407 4th St., Calgary, AB
None Sesame seeds white org bulk Variable Starts with 0 200804 Packed on OCT-21-21 Sold at Amaranth Health, 5222 130 Ave. SE, Calgary, AB
None Sesame seeds white org bulk Variable – sold in bulk None All product sold from August 23, 2021 to November 17, 2021, inclusively Sold at Amaranth Whole Foods Market, 7 Arbour Lake Dr. NW, Calgary, AB
Going Nuts Salad Crunchy (Mix) 300 g 6 28110 71284 4 L2136 Sold in Alberta and online

Industry is recalling certain sesame seed-containing products from the marketplace due to possible Salmonella contamination.  The recalled products have been sold as indicated in the table. There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these Sesame seed products.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated food recall warnings.

The CFIA is also verifying that industry is removing the recalled products from the marketplace.

ABOUT SALMONELLA

Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any recalled products and developed symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop a severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions. Some people get infected without getting sick or showing any symptoms. However, they may still spread the infections to others.

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Greenline Distributors — Kelly’s Nutrition Centre is recalling “Organic Sesame Seeds” from the marketplace because of possible Salmonella contamination.

The company reports that the recalled products were sold in the provinces of Saskatchewan and Ontario, according to a notice posted by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

This recall was triggered by test results, but the food safety agency did not report whether the testing was done by the company, one of its customers or the government.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated food recall warnings.

There is concern that consumers may have unused portions of the seeds in their homes because of their long shelf life. Consumers can use the following information to determine whether they have the recalled sesame seeds.

About Salmonella infections
Food that is contaminated with Salmonella bacteria usually does not look, smell or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection, but infants, children, seniors and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients need to be hospitalized. 

Older adults, children, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop a severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

It is possible for some people to be infected with the bacteria and to not get sick or show any symptoms, but to still be able to spread the infection to others.

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A California company is recalling more than 67,800 pounds of beef jerky because of misbranding and undeclared sesame oil, according to a recall notice posted by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

Legacy Food Company Inc. of Rancho Cucamonga, CA, produced the beef jerky on various dates from July 20, 2020 through May 14 this year. The recall notice did not include use-by or best-by dates for the products.

“The problem was discovered during routine FSIS label verification activities when it was determined that the labels did not accurately list all sub-ingredients,” according to the recall notice. “There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.”

Any one concerned about an allergic reaction because of the undeclared sesame should contact their health care provider.

Consumers can use the following label information to determine whether they have any of the jerky products:

  • 10-lb. packages containing “N4 Vua Kho Bo Curry Beef Jerky.”
  • 10-lb. packages containing “N8 Vua Kho Bo Flank Steak Beef Jerky Fish Sauce.”
  • 10-lb. packages containing “N9 Vua Kho Bo House Special Beef Jerky Fish Sauce.”
  • 10-lb. packages containing “Vua Kho Bo Hot Beef Jerky.”
  • 10-lb. packages containing “Hot Peppered Beef Jerky.”
  • 16-oz packages containing “Formosa Brand Hot Peppered Beef Jerky.”

The 10-pound products subject to recall bear establishment number “Est. 8256” and the 16-oz product listed above bears establishment number “EST 2446” inside the USDA mark of inspection. 

These items were sold online and shipped to retail stores in California. The 10-pound products are sold in bulk packaging and were removed from their original packaging and repackaged and relabeled for online sales. Retail stores remove the products from their original packaging and display them in bins for sale.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase, according to the FSIS.

To view labels of all products, click here.

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Coming in at No. 9 and trailing the first eight contenders by 17 years may not sound like a victory, but sesame’s ninth place finish on the official list of “major allergens” is a big win for supporters of the FASTER Act.

Consumers, advocacy groups and dozens of legislators have been working for years to have sesame added to the list, which since 2004 has consisted of milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soy. With President Biden’s signature in recent days, the Food Allergy Safety, Treatment, Education and Research Act became law and among other things put sesame on the list.

By becoming the ninth food to be listed as a major food allergen, sesame comes under the labeling regulations already imposed on the eight other major allergens. The new labeling must be in place by Jan. 1, 2023.

Some companies such as Hershey’s and General Mills already include sesame among the allergens they specifically identify on their labels. Identification requirements for sesame will now be subject to allergen labeling requirements from the Food and Drug Administration.

More than 1.1 million people in America are allergic to sesame, according to a 2019 study published in the journal JAMA (the Journal of American Medical Association) Network Open. The published study reports that children who have food allergies usually do not out grow them and adults can develop allergies as they age. Reactions can vary and in some cases be life threatening.

A challenge faced by people with food allergies is trying to figure out what is actually in the packaged food they are considering buying, according to Lisa Gable, CEO of FARE (Food Allergy Research & Education), a non-governmental organization engaged in food allergy advocacy and the largest private funder of food allergy research. FARE has been advocating for the passage of the FASTER Act alongside Rep. Doris Matsui, D-CA, Rep. Anna Eshoo, CA, and more than 90 other legislative supporters for more than two years.

No longer will food companies be able to use such terms as spices and flavors that include sesame without specifying it as an ingredient. People allergic to sesame must also watch for the ingredients tahini, sesamol and gomasio. 

Between now and 2023 consumers should also be on the lookout for foods that often include sesame. Such foods include falafel, hummus and certain rices. Sesame oil is commonly used as an ingredient in Asian cuisine. The allergen can also be found in chips, cereals, snack bars and a variety of other foods.

In addition to labeling regulations for sesame, the FASTER ACT requires the Department of Health and Human Services to report on a variety of issues related to food allergies in 18 months. 

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The U.S. House has approved the Food Allergy Safety, Treatment, Education and Research (FASTER) Act,  bringing sesame one step closer to becoming the ninth major allergen, as defined by federal law.

The legislation requires that sesame be labeled on packaged foods and prioritizes food allergy research. This action follows the Senate passage of the FASTER Act March 3. The bill now goes to President Biden for his consideration.

According to Lisa Gable, CEO of FARE (Food Allergy Research & Education), the world’s leading non-governmental organization engaged in food allergy advocacy and the largest private funder of food allergy research, there are more than 1.5 million Americans who are allergic to sesame. FARE has been advocating for the passage of the FASTER Act alongside Rep. Doris Matsui, D-CA, Rep. Anna Eshoo, CA, and more than 90 other legislative supporters for more than two years.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest also has been working to get sesame labeled as a major allergen since they petitioned the Food and Drug Administration back in November 2014 for similar allergen disclosure.

“Our advocacy has been grounded in emerging science demonstrating that the prevalence and severity of sesame allergy warranted labeling protections on par with the original major allergens,” according to a statement released by CSPI.

“There is nothing more important to the food allergy community than ensuring that the FASTER Act is put into law,” said Lisa Gable, FARE CEO. “On behalf of the nearly 1.6 million Americans who are allergic to sesame, I thank Rep. Doris Matsui, D-CA, and Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-NC, for championing this critical piece of bipartisan legislation and now look forward to President Biden signing it into law.”

Other advocates for the Act included Sens. Tim Scott, R-SC, and Chris Murphy, D-CT, who co-sponsored the legislation in the Senate.

The FASTER Act has been the highest legislative priority for FARE. The FASTER Act would require that sesame be labeled as an allergen on packaged foods. Sesame would become the ninth food allergen for which the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires plain-language labeling. Sesame is often used when a label reads “natural flavors” or “natural spices,” adding another layer of difficulty when consumers review product labels at their local grocery stores. If approved, this would be the first time since 2006 that a new allergen has been added to the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA). 

“Today is a testament to the hard work of thousands of food allergy advocates who sent emails, made calls, and visited members of Congress and staff to build support and make sesame the ninth allergen to be labeled under law,” said Rep. Matsui.

“The outpouring of support was incredible, and I’d like to thank Lisa Gable and everyone at FARE for their hard work mobilizing this dedicated, resilient community. The FASTER Act will truly make a difference for those living with potentially life-threatening food allergies and we are proud that it will now be signed into law.”

The FASTER Act would also require the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) to issue a report on scientific opportunities in food allergy research that examines prevention, treatment and new cures. In addition, the legislation establishes a risk-based scientific process and framework for establishing additional allergens covered by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

“Today, I was proud to see the FASTER Act pass the House, said Rep. McHenry.  “This bill provides a much-needed update to allergen labeling laws to include sesame, which affects the over 1.5 million people allergic to sesame. Additionally, the bill will enable us to better treat the millions of Americans that suffer from life-threatening food allergies by requiring the Secretary of Health and Human Services to regularly review promising food allergy treatments and research.”

“Today is a life-changing and life-affirming day for our family and for the families of the nearly 1.6 million Americans allergic to sesame,” said Talia Day, a food allergy advocate with two children who are allergic to sesame.

“With today’s passage and hopefully President Biden’s signature, no longer will I have to live in fear that my children could accidentally eat something that would kill them simply because it was not included on a food label. I thank Senators Scott and Murphy, Representatives Matsui and McHenry, FARE, and the thousands of food allergy advocates who helped make today possible and created a better future for the more than 32 million Americans living with potentially life-threatening food allergies.” 

About FARE
FARE (Food Allergy Research & Education) has the mission to improve the quality of life and the health of individuals with food allergies, and to provide them hope through the promise of new treatments. To learn more about FARE, visit their Living Teal YouTube channel or www.foodallergy.org.

About CSPI
The Center for Science in the Public Interest is a nonprofit food and health organization that serves as a watchdog group for public interests. To learn more about CSPI, visit their website here.

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Sesame oil packed in August 2020 is now under recall because of positive Salmonella test results. The product labels do not have expiration dates.

Mediterranean Food Inc. of Warren, MI, is recalling its 2-pound plastic jars of “Alqosh Sesame Oil” after receiving notice of the problem found during routine testing by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD). The department collected the test sample from one of the retailers that received the implicated sesame oil.

The recalled sesame oil was distributed in Michigan retail stores and distributors via the company’s staff, according to a recall notice from Mediterranean Food Inc. that was posted by the Food and Drug Administration. 

“The Product was distributed in the period from 11/06/2020 to 12/10/2020,” according to the company notice. “The product comes in a 2Lb, clear plastic jar marked with lot # 16082020 on the side of the jar and with a Production date of 08/16/2020 stamped on the side.

“Production of the product has been suspended while FDA and the company continue their investigation as to the source of the problem.”

As of the posting of the recall notice no confirmed illnesses had been reported in relation to the recalled product.

Consumers who have purchased Alqosh Sesame Oil “Tahin” 2Lb plastic jar with lot # 16082020 should not consume the product and are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 586-777-3460.

About Salmonella infections
Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

Some people get infected without getting sick or showing any symptoms. However, they may still spread the infections to others.

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A European alert food system is nearing 500 reports because of the unauthorized substance ethylene oxide in products with sesame seeds.

Belgium made the first alert in early September 2020 in the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF) concerning pesticide residues in various lots of sesame seeds from India. Three months later, most European countries have been affected.

Thousands of conventional and organic products with long shelf life dates such as cereals, chocolate, biscuits, bread, crackers, sesame oil, bagels, and Asian dishes have been affected.

More than half of the EU’s annual imports of 70,000 tons of sesame comes from India.

Additional checks

A recall by Ikea

The European Commission strengthened checks on sesame seeds from India in October 2020 with regulation requiring they are tested prior to export to the EU to certify compliance and include an official certificate. The rules also increased checks at border control posts with controls needed on 50 percent of all consignments at the EU border. They are already on the list of products subject to extra checks because of Salmonella.

It is thought that ethylene oxide was used to stop the growth of Salmonella during the storage of sesame seeds in India.

Suppliers who delivered contaminated batches include Dhairya International, Nature Bio Foods Ltd., Agri Food Products, GSV International, Shyam Industries and Dhaval Agri Exports.

In the EU, the use of ethylene oxide for the disinfection of foodstuffs is not permitted because it is classed as a carcinogen and mutagen. The maximum residue limit for sesame seeds is set at 0.05 milligrams per kilogram. Use is allowed in the Unites States at 7 mg/kg for sesame seeds. Levels found by Belgium were as high as 186 mg/kg but mostly between 0.1 and 10 mg/kg. Some batches exceeded the maximum limit by more than 1,000 times.

Ethylene oxide is a volatile and reactive compound that only remains in tiny amounts in treated foods, according to officials. Detecting and calculating the amount of the substance in food is a complicated process that, for financial reasons, is only used for individual cases in routine food monitoring programs, according to CVUA Stuttgart.

Other foods or countries involved?

One of the recalled items

Member state experts, the EU Commission, and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) held a food and feed crisis coordinators meeting in October. Some countries called for reinforced vigilance on products like pepper and spices where past analysis also showed ethylene oxide.

In late November 2020 there was a meeting in the phytopharmaceuticals and residues section of the Standing Committee on Plants, Animals, Food and Feed committee that mentioned ethylene oxide.

One country said its national assessment indicated the current MRL of 0.05 mg/kg may not sufficiently protect some consumer groups. Another reported finding ethylene oxide in products not from India but they were compliant with the associated MRLs.

A report from the EU Reference Laboratory for Residues of Pesticides said it is unknown for how long ethylene oxide-fumigation has been in use or increasingly applied to sesame seeds in India but experts suspect it has been common practice for years.

An assessment in Belgium indicated a potential chronic risk. This means that if a consumer was to have the implicated seeds every day of their life, and in large quantities, there could be a risk to health. An assessment by the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) and Wageningen Food Safety Research found it was “hardly possible” to eat safe quantities of bread, crackers, or cookies with sesame seeds containing ethylene oxide at a level of 10 mg/kg.

In November, the Food Standards Agency said it was not advocating a full consumer recall of affected products and favored a withdrawal as the risk to individuals is low and most products already purchased are likely to have been consumed, making such a recall disproportionate.

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The European Commission has strengthened checks on sesame seeds from India as recalls due to pesticide residue contamination continue.

The move was prompted by food safety incidents notified through the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF) portal and information from official controls by member states on the seeds from India.

An alert was first raised by Belgium in early September and now includes more than 50 notifications from France, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Italy, Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Austria, Norway, and Sweden.

Contaminated seeds have also been sent to Andorra, Bulgaria, Denmark, Estonia, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates, and the United Kingdom.

High-level contamination
In September, very high levels of ethylene oxide were notified through RASFF in certain batches of sesame seeds originating in or sent from India and having entered the EU. Those results exceed more than 1,000 times the maximum residue limit (MRL) of 0.05 milligrams per kilogram for ethylene oxide set by regulation. Ethylene oxide is also not approved as an active substance for use in plant protection products.

Recall of chocolate by Lindt

Such contamination constitutes a serious risk to human health as it is classed as a mutagen, a carcinogen, and a reproductive toxicant, according to the Commission. Ethylene oxide is not an acute health hazard but can be harmful if continually ingested over time. Experts at the NVWA are investigating how much-contaminated sesame seed you have to eat before there are issues and results are expected shortly.

Ethylene oxide was used to inhibit the growth of Salmonella during the storage of sesame seeds in India.

Several batches of sesame seeds from five producers in India were contaminated with ethylene oxide above the MRL, according to the Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA).

Contaminated sesame products have been used in a range of products including cereals, salads, chocolate, biscuits, bread, crackers, sesame oil, bagels, and Asian dishes.

Increased border checks
The official certificate which accompanies all consignments of sesame seeds from India should also state the products have been sampled and analyzed for residues of pesticides to be monitored in/on products of plant origin, and that results show compliance with EU legislation on maximum residue levels of pesticides. The results of sampling and analysis should be attached to the certificate.

The frequency of physical and identity checks for pesticide residues on sesame seeds from India at the EU borders should be set at 50 percent for the time being. They are already on the list of products subject to extra checks due to Salmonella.

Consignments of sesame seeds from India that left the country of origin or the place of dispatch before the regulation became applicable this week are not subject to the enhanced rules.

Mattilsynet (Norwegian Food Safety Authority) has instructed companies with products containing sesame seeds that have been proven to contain ethylene oxide to destroy items by incineration as they cannot be used for food, feed, or fertilizer.

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The presence of an unauthorized substance in sesame seeds from India has prompted a spate of product recalls across Europe.

The ethylene oxide alert was first raised by Belgium in early September but now concerns almost 20 countries. Ethylene oxide is a genotoxic carcinogen after regular consumption.

Sesame seeds were used in the production of flour and recalled products include bread and bagels.

Several supermarket chains in Belgium have recalled products from shelves because of the high content of residues in the sesame seeds in them.

Seeds used in a variety of products
Austria, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland are all listed as being affected.

Recalled Delhaize bagels

In Belgium, Soubry, Soezie, Colruyt, Albert Heijn, Delhaize, Focaccia BV, La Lorraine Bakery Group, ’t Bakhuisje, l’Artemeersmolen and Aveve have issued recalls. In France, Auchan recalled some bagels, as did Aldente GmbH in Germany. Authorities told people who had the products not to consume them and to return items to the point of sale for a refund.

The use of ethylene oxide as a component of plant protection products is prohibited under EU regulation but its use as part of biocidal products is authorized for certain items.

Ethylene oxide is used to control insects as a fumigant for spices, seasonings, and foodstuffs. It is employed instead of high temperature processes that may damage certain products such as herbs, spices and seeds.

Ethylene oxide is used by the U.S. spice industry to prevent microbial contaminants such as Salmonella and E. coli, reduce bacterial loads, yeast and mold, coliforms and other pathogens.

In late 2019, Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency proposed to establish maximum residue limits (MRLs) for ethylene oxide on dried vegetables and sesame seeds to permit the sale of foods containing such residues. It is an insecticide registered in Canada for use on whole or ground spices and processed natural seasonings.

The MRLs proposed for ethylene oxide of 7 parts per million are the same as American tolerances. There are no Codex MRLs listed for ethylene oxide in or on any commodity.

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An estimate of 17 percent of children who have food allergies are allergic to sesame, according to research published in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology. Sesame is one of the 10 most common childhood food allergies and severe reactions are common.

The Food and Drug Administration is currently considering adding sesame to the list of allergens requiring discloser on food labels. Failure to include required information about allergens on food labels is a violation of federal law. Undeclared sesame has resulted in a number of recalls in recent years for food under the jurisdiction of the FDA as well as the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

An estimated 20 percent to 30 percent of children outgrow their sesame allergies. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) estimates that 1.1 million or 0.23 percent of the U.S. population has a sesame allergy.

“Given how frequently sesame allergy occurs among children who are allergic to other foods, it is important to use caution to the extent possible when exposing these children to sesame,” said Anthony S. Fauci, director of the NIAID.

Editor’s note originally posted Nov. 3: At this time, the credibility of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is not to be trusted. Both agencies have shown a reckless disregard for the public’s right to know, and their reliability going forward remains suspect. For the next six weeks, Food Safety News will publish this note above on every story involving the FDA or CDC..

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