logo Rochester Meat CoMinnesota’s Rochester Meat Co. has recalled more than 6 tons pounds of pork sausage products because of misbranding, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

The pork sausage contains monosodium glutamate (MSG), but the ingredient is not declared on the product labels.

The raw, pork sausage products were produced on various dates from Nov. 14, 2016, through Feb. 3, this year. The 13,330 pounds of recalled sausage can be identified by the following packaging information:

  • 10-pound bulk boxes containing 40 patties per box of Rochester Meat Co. “Pork Sausage Patties,” bearing the case code 10012724390418.
  • porksausagepatties_406x25010-pound bulk boxes containing 50 patties per box of Rochester Meat Co. “Pork Sausage Patties,” bearing the case code 10012724390517.
  • 10-pound bulk boxes containing 80 patties per box of Rochester Meat Co. “Pork Sausage Patties,” bearing the case code 1002724390029.
  • 10-pound bulk boxes containing 50 patties per box of Rochester Meat Co. “Pork Sausage Patties NAT,” bearing the case code 1002724390036.
  • 10-pound bulk boxes containing 160 1-ounce links of Rochester Meat Co. “Pork Sausage Links,” bearing the case code 1002724391002.

The pork products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 8999” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to institutional locations in Indiana, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

The mistake was discovered March 2 by company personnel during routine label reviews. FSIS was notified on that same date.

There’s not yet been any confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Debbie Green, Customer Service Manager, at 618-857-4011.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

recalled Great Value mini chicken sausages
To see photos of all of the recalled products, please click on any of the images.

Almost 200,000 pounds of Vienna sausage and other chicken sausage products, including some packaged under Wal-Mart’s Great Value brand, are under recall because they contain monosodium glutamate (MSG) that is not declared on their labels.

Century Packing Corp., based in Las Piedras, Puerto Rico, distributed the products to retailers and institutional foodservice operations, including schools, in Florida and Puerto Rico, according to the recall notice posted on the USDA’s Food Safety ad inspection Service (FSIS) website.

“The problem was discovered on Feb. 9, by FSIS Inspection Program Personnel (IPP) while performing routine label verification activities,” according to the recall notice.

“The IPP observed that the MSG ingredient, included in the bouillon seasoning used in the formulation of multiple chicken sausage products, was not declared on the finished chicken sausage packaging labels.There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.”

recalled Sedonas Vienna sausage recalled Econo chicken sausageCentury Packing reports the recalled products were produced from Jan. 1, 2015 through Feb. 13 this year. All of the recalled products have the establishment number “P-7375” inside the USDA mark of inspection.

Consumers and others can identify the recalled products by looking for the following label information:

  • 2.78-oz. pouches of “Great Value Minis – Bites of Chicken Sausage and Bouillon” with Packaging Dates of “01/01/2015 – 02/13/2017”
  • 10-oz. pouches of “Great Value Minis – Bites of Chicken Sausage and Bouillon” with Packaging Dates of “01/01/2015 – 02/13/2017”
  • 2.78-oz. pouches of “Econo Mini – Bite Size Chicken Sausages” with Packaging Dates of “ 01/01/2015 – 02/13/2017”
  • 10-oz. pouches of “Econo Mini – Bite Size Chicken Sausages” with Packaging Dates of “01/01/2015 – 02/13/2017”
  • 5-oz. cans of “Sedano’s Chicken Vienna Sausage in Chicken Broth” with Packaging Dates of “08/2015” and “05/2016”
  • 117 units per pouch of “ Carmela Foods Chicken Sausage and Bouillon” with Packaging Dates of “02/2016 – 02/14/2017”

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

View Labels

Wycen Foods Inc., a San Leandro, CA, establishment, is recalling approximately 809 pounds of Chinese-style chicken sausages, a dried snack food, because they are misbranded and contain monosodium glutamate (MSG), which is not declared on the label, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced Thursday.
The following product is subject to recall:

  • Individual “Chinese Style Chicken Sausage.”

The products were produced June 12, Aug. 14, Sept. 4, and Oct. 24, 2013, and were sold at a single San Francisco retail location. The products have a shelf life of one year. Some consumers may refrigerate, continue to air dry or freeze them. The problem was discovered by FSIS during a label verification activity. The problem occurred when the company changed the product’s formulation to include MSG, but neglected to list the ingredient on the label. FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider. FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and to ensure that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. Media and consumers with questions about the recall should contact the company’s chief operating officer, Cynthia Wong, at (510) 351-1988.

More than 1.7 million pounds of Bob Evans Maple Links and Maple Patties are being recalled for not putting monosodium glutamate (MSG) on the label, BEF Foods Inc. announced Monday. The Columbus, OH-based discovered the problem during a label audit. The mislabeled products were produced between April 4 and Oct. 19, 2012, according to USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). When the product was reformulated, it had stopped using a spice blend containing MSG and removed GSG from the ingredient list on the product label. However, production units in Hillsdale, MI and Xenia, OH continued to use the spice blend. USDA does not classify MSG as an allergen , but it can cause severe reaction in people who are sensitive to it. Neither BEF Foods Inc nor FSIS has not yet received any reports of people having an adverse reaction to the recalled links and patties. Included in the recall are: • 12-oz. packages of “Bob Evans Maple Links” with UPC numbers of “075900002300”, “075900000085” and “075900002324.” • 12-oz. packages of “Bob Evans Maple Patties” with UPC numbers of “0759000025028” and “075900000795” and “075900002522.” The establishment numbers are  “M-952” or “M-6785” printed on the side of the package. Product purchased fresh will have a use-by date between Oct. 14, 2012 and Dec. 4, 2012 listed. Frozen products may be identified by any of the following Julian codes: 0264 through 0365, 1001 through 1365, and 2001 through 2293.    

A California-based company is recalling 55,757 pounds of pork dumpling products because they contain monosodium glutamate (MSG), but this ingredient is not listed on packaging. CB Foods, Inc. of Monte, CA issued a voluntary recall of the pork dumplings after a food safety assessment by USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service revealed that the chicken powder used in the product is made with MSG, but that only the powder and not the MSG were listed on its label. The products subject to recall include 12.5 pound cases or trays of “Pork Shaomi Dumpling” with a case code of 002. Each box is marked with establishment number “EST. 39932,” located inside the USDA mark of inspection. The recalled products were produced from June of 2011 until June 5, 2012 and were distributed to hotels in California and Nevada. No adverse health affects linked to consumption of the pork dumplings have been reported. Consumers with questions are urged to call CB Foods’ manager Nicole Li at 626-579-1238. Click here to view the recall notice.

Quality Food Distributor of Las Vegas, NV, is recalling approximately 50,820 pounds of Steamed BBQ Flavored Pork Buns because they contain monosodium glutamate (MSG), which is not declared on the label, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service said in a news release.

 

steamed-pork-buns-iphone.jpg

During a label review and routine food safety assessment, FSIS personnel determined that the MSG was used in the marinade used during the cooking process and was left off the label of the final product.

There have been no reports of adverse reactions.

The recall is for 12-lb. cases of “STEAMED BBQ FLAVORED PORK BUNS,” containing 96 pork buns per case with the establishment number “EST. 34064” inside the USDA mark of inspection. This product was produced on April 4 and 5, 2011 and was sold to a distributor in Las Vegas, Nev. This product may have been further distributed to restaurants. 

For more information contact the company’s owner, Joyce Kwan, at 702-889-0505.

London Meat Co. of New York, NY is recalling approximately 200 pounds of sausage because it contains monosodium glutamate (MSG), which is not listed on the label, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced Monday.

There have been no reports of adverse reactions.

FSIS said its personnel discovered the problem during a routine inspection. FSIS said the MSG was added as an ingredient when seasoning blends were changed, but the company did not update its product label.

The recall is of 5-lb boxes of “Milano’s Country Breakfast Sausage,” containing 80 sausage links per box. Each box bears the establishment number “EST. 8777” inside the USDA mark of inspection.

These recalled sausages were made-to-order for restaurants and caterers in the New York City area through Feb. 21, 2012. 

For more information contact the company’s co-owner Michael Milano at 212- 255-2135. 

The USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service are seeking public comments on proposed rules and notices, which are viewable on the FSIS Federal Register & Rulemaking webpage.

Of note is that FSIS extended the written comment period on the proposed Salmonella framework to Dec. 16, 2022. Written comments should be submitted through Regulations.govVisit the FSIS website to view the Federal Register notice and details on how to comment.

FSIS is currently seeking comments on the following:

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here)

Jeff Benedict’s 2013 bestseller “Poisoned” has been made into a Netflix documentary and a new edition of the book that is tied to the release of the film is coming out in January 2023.

The 2011 book, “Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. coli Outbreak that Changed the Way Americans Eat,” chronicles a deadly 1993 Jack in the Box E. coli outbreak and the rise of Bill Marler as a food safety attorney. The new edition can be pre-ordered now.

“Turning this story into a film has been a writer’s dream.  Grateful to Bill and Julie Marler for trusting me with their odyssey (I didn’t expect to find a love story when I set out to write about a food borne illness outbreak),” Benedict wrote about the documentary and new edition. “Fortunate that Simon & Schuster and AvidReader Press keep me around. Lucky to have worked with Ross Dinerstein and his great filmmaking team at Campfire Studios.”

The documentary is being executive produced by award-winning author and journalist Jeff Benedict. Benedict is joining forces with Ross Dinerstein’s Campfire — know for Jiro Dreams of Sushi and HBO Max’s Heaven’s Gate — as well as filmmaker Stephanie Soechtig and her banner Atlas Films — Fed Up; The Devil We Know — for the documentary, which carries the same name as the book. 

The documentary will chronicle the evolution and history of America’s food supply system, as well as the untold stories from the victims of notorious outbreaks and spotlighting high-profile criminal prosecutions for those responsible.

“Poisoned” will go directly to the source, following the distribution trail from start to finish, examining where the process breaks down, as well as the bureaucratic red tape and collusion among lobbyists and lawmakers that work against addressing this life-or-death problem.

The documentary makers are promoting the project as an all-encompassing, infuriating, and at times even humorous roller-coaster ride that seeks to ask the question: “How did we get to a place with 15 government agencies in charge of the country’s food, yet none of them can keep its citizens safe?”

The film will be directed by Soechtig. Dinerstein serves as producer alongside Soechtig and Atlas Films’ Kristin Lazure. Benedict and Campfire’s Ross Girard and Rebecca Evans are executive producers.

About Campfire
Founded in 2014 and headed by producer and CEO Ross Dinerstein, Campfire is a production company known for its broad bench of content. scripted and unscripted, for feature film and TV/streaming platforms. Part of Wheelhouse Entertainment, Campfire’s projects include docuseries Heaven’s Gate: The Cult of Cults for HBO Max; Hulu’s upcoming WeWork feature documentary; FX’s first true crime docuseries The Most Dangerous Animal of All; Netflix’s true-crime documentary series John Grisham’s The Innocent Man; and Netflix’s Emmy-nominated, scripted series Special.

Editor’s note: Bill Marler is publisher of Food Safety News.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here)

October is National Seafood Month and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is releasing new educational materials on the food safety of fish.

FDA recommends eating fish as part of a healthy diet. However, they also encourage children and people who are or might become pregnant or breastfeeding to be careful and eat fish that are lower in mercury.

Why fish is nutritious:

Fish provide key nutrients that support a child’s brain development, such as:

  • Omega-3 (called DHA and EPA) and omega-6 fats
  • Iron
  • Choline
  • Iodine (during pregnancy)

Choline also supports the development of the baby’s spinal cord. Fish provide iron and zinc to support children’s immune systems. Fish are a source of other nutrients like protein, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and selenium too.

FDA’s educational resources:

  • Two new PowerPoint slides

Eating Fish for Pregnancy and Breastfeeding and Eating Fish for Children slides for health educators to include in presentations, such as at conferences or in community settings.

  • Infographics 

Information about eating fish as part of a healthy diet during pregnancy and breastfeeding and for children.

Information about eating fish while pregnant and why including fish in children’s diets is important for their growth and development. Available in English, Simplified Chinese, and Spanish.

Includes sample messages about eating fish as part of a healthy eating pattern for Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest, along with newsletter text, infographics, and web badges.

  • Translations of the fish advice and fish names

Available in Arabic, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), French, Hmong, Khmer, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese (PDF; XSLX).

The FDA/EPA advice about eating fish features a chart that describes dozens of healthy and lower mercury options. While it is important to limit mercury in the diets of those who are pregnant or breastfeeding and children, many types of fish are both nutritious and lower in mercury.

For more information, click here.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here)