A company is recalling broccoli microgreens because of Salmonella according to a notice from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

The recall for Broadwood Farm brand microgreens was triggered by the company and is related to a recall of broccoli sprouting seeds posted in recent days. The seeds were sold nationally in Canada in consumer and producer size packages.

Contaminated seeds can produce contaminated microgreens and sprouts.

The recall notice says the microgreens were produced in Ottawa but does not say what volume is being recalled. The company reported that the broccoli microgreens were sold in the province of Ontario. As of the posting of the recall notice there hadn’t been any confirmed illnesses reported in relation to the microgreens.

“The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated food recall warnings,” according to the recall notice. The agency is overseeing the removal of the recalled microgreens from the retailers. 

There is concern that consumers may have the recalled microgreens in their homes because the expiration date is not until Nov. 13.

Any consumers who have the microgreens in their homes should throw them away and clean any containers or surfaces they came into contact with.

Consumers can use the following label information to determine whether they have the implicated microgreens. 

Brand Product Size UPC Codes
Broadwood Farm Broccoli Microgreens 75 g 6 27987 64959 8 November 13, 2021
Broadwood Farm Seasonal Mix Microgreens 100 g 6 27987 64958 1 November 13, 2021

About Salmonella infections
Food that is contaminated with Salmonella bacteria usually does not look, smell or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection, but infants, children, seniors and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled broccoli microgreens and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients need to be hospitalized. 

Older adults, children, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop a severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

It is possible for some people to be infected with the bacteria and to not get sick or show any symptoms, but to still be able to spread the infection to others.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Microgreens growing operations are an emerging industry and the topic of research that surveyed growers in the United States. The online survey, answered by 176 growers, included questions about farm demographics, growing techniques, microgreen varieties grown and food safety practices.

The study helped identify relationships between farm characteristics and food safety practices, according to the research report. 

The survey found that farms with more employees appeared to engage in more food safety practices overall, except for seed disinfection. Seed disinfection appeared to be more common among smaller farms. 

The statistics show a significant relationship between growing media testing at least once per year and the total number of employees and total number of employees who directly handle microgreens. This possibly indicates that larger operations are better equipped to engage in routine quality assurance procedures, according to the report.

Routine documentation practices were also significantly associated with annual microgreens revenue, passing a good agricultural practices audit, and the number of previous food safety training sessions attended.

Overall, this study aims to inform research, outreach, and training efforts on the growing systems, microgreens varieties, and production practices relevant to microgreens safety.

Passion behind the project
Gina Misra, a microgreen researcher, who worked on the project at the University of Arkansas with Kristen Gibson in the Department of Food Science, has a special connection to microgreens and small farm growers.

“For my whole career, I’ve been interested in agriculture and sustainability,” Misra told Food Safety News. She first got interested in indoor farming while working as a part-time research assistant in an astrobiology lab at Penn State in 2010 developing a closed-loop water treatment system for space flight. 

For the next several years after that she worked as a molecular biologist, while her husband worked on helping build a research institute with some colleagues called Blue Marble Space

 In 2015, Misra and her husband decided to start their microgreens farm GreenSpace as a Blue Marble Space initiative, partly to generate income for the company and partly to do science education and community outreach. 

 Critical findings
Misra said that very few commercial scale farms responded to the survey despite attempts to recruit them.

“So what we know from this survey applies primarily to small — less than $10,000 per year in microgreens revenue — beginning growers entering the market within the last 10 years. 

“Microgreens farmers appear to be more aware of food safety than we expected — they had gone to food safety trainings and most had daily facility and equipment washing procedures.”

The survey found that farms with more employees appeared to engage in more food safety practices overall, except for seed disinfection. Seed disinfection appeared to be more common among smaller farms. 

 Another critical finding was that documentation practices among small farms were lacking, which are required by the Produce Safety Rule.

 “Most farms did not test their growing media, probably because it isn’t required. However, we do know that soil can be a source of contamination for produce,” Misra said.

 Takeaways
 Misra said she thinks microgreen farmers should consider more on-farm documentation practices for things such as food safety training, sanitation schedules, seed and growing media orders, water and growing media testing.

“It will help you keep track of things in case there is a product recall or other issue. Recalls do happen, though rare. We do our best to prevent them up front with good sanitation, but it’s always good to be prepared,” Misra explained.

Misra continues to work at the nonprofit research institute Blue Marble Space and through their microgreen project. She is in regular contact with many small microgreens growers and their online communities.

 She said she is hopeful that small microgreen growers read the paper to get the full picture, which can be found here.

The full study is available here

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here)

A third recall has been initiated in Canada related to a Salmonella outbreak associated with fresh sprouts from Sunsprout. The recall covers micro-greens including alfalfa and onion, and alfalfa and radish.

There is concern that consumers may have the recalled microgreens in their homes because of their relatively long shelf life. The sprouted greens named in the expansion of the Sunsprout product recall have best-before dates up to and including Oct. 5, according to the recall notice posted by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Previously recalled Sunsprout microgreens have best-before dates up to and including Oct. 13.

Brand Product Size UPC Codes
Sunsprout Micro – Greens Alfalfa & Onion 100 g 0 57621 13516 1 All best before dates up to and including BBOCT05
Sunsprout Micro – Greens Alfalfa & Radish 100 g 0 57621 13512 3 All best before dates up to and including BBOCT05

Public Health Ontario is investigating an outbreak of infections associated with the recalled microgreens, according to the food inspection agency.

The company reports having distributed toe recalled sprouted greens to retail stores in Ontario and British Columbia.

“This recall was triggered by findings by the CFIA during its investigation into a foodborne illness outbreak. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated,” according to the recall notice.

About Salmonella infections
Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled sprouted microgreens and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop a severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

A Canadian company is recalling organic microgreens because of possible contamination with Salmonella, according to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

The agency is urging consumers to check their homes for the Picoudi brand microgreens and immediately discard them if they have them on hand. The company Les Jardins Picoudi shipped the implicated sprouts to Quebec and New Brunswick, according to the recall notice. 

Inspectors from the CFIA as well as staff from the Quebec agriculture department (MAPAQ) are investigating the situation in search of the source of the contamination.

“This recall was triggered by MAPAQ. A food safety investigation is being conducted. If other high-risk products are recalled, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) will notify the public through updated food recall warnings,” according to the recall notice.

“The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing the recalled products from the marketplace. There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

The recalled microgreens are:

Brand Product Size UPC Codes
Picoudi Organic Broccoli Microgreens 35 g 8 13526 00001 6 3 233
Picoudi Organic Broccoli Microgreens 75 g 8 13526 00011 5 3 233
Picoudi Organic Arugula Microgreens 35 g 8 13526 00006 1 3 233
Picoudi Organic Arugula Microgreens 75 g 8 13526 00016 0 3 233
Picoudi Organic Coriander Microgreens 35 g 8 13526 00005 4 3 233
Picoudi Organic Coriander Microgreens 75 g 8 13526 00015 3 3 233

About Salmonella infections
Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any recalled products and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop a severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Canadian officials are warning the public to avoid eating certain microgreens because they could be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

In a recall notice posted May 22, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency reported that Pousses et Cie brand “Mix Spicy Microgreens” that were distributed in Quebec were flagged after government test results showed they could be contaminated.

The Canadian agency did not report what volume of product is subject to the recall or what retailers had received it.

Consumers should look for the following label information to determine whether they have the recalled produce in their homes: 75-gram packaged with the UPC number 6 74001 03531 8 and a best-before date of “19MA20061FE05.” 

“This recall was triggered by Canadian Food Inspection Agencytest results,” according to the recall notice. 

“The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings. The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.”

Information about Listeria infections
Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled product and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled product should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop. 

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses. 

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn or even stillbirth.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

A Canadian greenhouse is recalling an undisclosed volume of two varieties of organic microgreens products because government testing showed contamination with Listeria monocytogenes bacteria.

Ontario-based Greenbelt Greenhouse Ltd. distributed the recalled microgreens in Ontario, according to the recall notice from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The government notice did not specify what retailers received the microgreens.

“Consumers should not consume the recalled products,” according to the CFIA notice. “Check to see if you have recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased.”

To determine whether they have the recalled products, consumers should look for the following label information:

Brand Name Specific Product Size Date Code UPC number
Greenbelt Microgreens Broccoli Microgreens 75 g best before
08/26/18
8 90082 00016 2
Greenbelt Microgreens Spicy Microgreen Mix 75 g best before
08/28/18
8 90082 00000 1

This recall was triggered by CFIA test results. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products.

Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick, according to the CFIA notice. It can take up to 70 days for symptoms to develop, so anyone who handled or ate any of the recalled microgreens should monitor themselves for symptoms in the coming weeks. No illnesses had been reported as of the posting of the notice on Aug. 25.

Symptoms can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache and neck stiffness. Pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, the infection can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn or even stillbirth. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

This recall was triggered by CFIA test results. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Goodleaf Community Farms Ltd. of Nova Scotia, Canada, is recalling their Daikon Radish microgreens because of the risk of Listeria contamination, according to a recall notice posted on The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) website.

The recalled microgreens are labeled with an expiration date of June 30, so there is concern retailers and consumers may still have them on hand.

“The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace,” according to the recall notice. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation which may lead to the recall of other products.

The recall notice did not provide any details about how the potential contamination was discovered, reporting only that “this recall was triggered by the company.”

The Goodleaf brand Daikon Radish microgreens were distributed throughout New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island. Consumers can look for the following details to determine whether they have any of the recalled product on hand:

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
Goodleaf Daikon Radish (microgreens) 75 g BB/MA JN 30
LOT# MR088
6 28451 71410 1

No illnesses had been reported in relation to the recalled microgreens as of the posting of the recall notice.

“Check to see if you have recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased,” according to the recall notice.

Consumers with questions can contact Goodleaf Community Farms Ltd. through the company’s website contact form.

Advice to consumers
Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled microgreens and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical attention and tell their doctors about the possible exposure to the pathogen.

Also, because it can take up to 70 days after exposure for symptoms to develop, people who have eaten the recalled microgreens should monitor themselves for symptoms in the coming weeks.

Although healthy adults may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women. Other high-risk groups for serious infections that are sometimes fatal include young children, older people and anyone with a suppressed immune system.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

To view photos of all of the varieties of recalled Greenbelt Greenhouse microgreens, please click on the image.

Consumers are still at risk from recalled Greenbelt microgreens after Canadian officials updated the best-by date on the products, which could be contaminated with Listeria.

Instead of the previously reported best-by date, some of the recalled microgreens are stamped with an April 30 date, making it likely that consumers still have the potentially life-threatening fresh produce in their homes.

Initially the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) posted the recall notice this past week for the microgreens from Greenbelt Greenhouse Ltd. of Ottawa, Canada. Monday the CFIA posted an updated recall with corrected best-before dates.

Consumers should remember that refrigeration does not kill Listeria, or keep it from growing.

“The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace,” according to the updated recall.

The updated recall notice did not provide any details about how the potential contamination was discovered, reporting only that “this recall was triggered by the company,” as did the original notice.

The Greenbelt Microgreens were distributed throughout Alberta and British Columbia. According to the CFIA “The corrections for these products are marked by an asterisk (*)”; Consumers can look for the following details to determine whether they have any of the recalled product on hand:

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
Greenbelt Microgreens Arugula Microgreens 75 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00012 4
Greenbelt Microgreens Arugula Microgreens 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00013 1
Greenbelt Microgreens Broccoli Microgreens 75 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00016 2
Greenbelt Microgreens Broccoli Microgreens 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
8 90082 00017 9
Greenbelt Microgreens Fresh Microgreen Mix 75 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00041 4
Greenbelt Microgreens Fresh Microgreen Mix 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00080 3
Greenbelt Microgreens Sweet & Crunchy Microgreen Mix 75 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00006 3
Greenbelt Microgreens Sweet & Crunchy Microgreen Mix 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00007 0
Greenbelt Microgreens Spicy Microgreen Mix 75 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00000 1
Greenbelt Microgreens Spicy Microgreen Mix 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00001 8
Greenbelt Microgreens Pea Shoots Microgreens 100 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00023 0
Greenbelt Microgreens Pea Shoots Microgreens 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00024 7
Greenbelt Microgreens Sunflower Microgreens 100 g Best Before:
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00030 8
Greenbelt Microgreens Sunflower Microgreens 200 g Best Before:
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00031 5
Greenbelt Microgreens Wheatgrass 114 g Best Before:
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00032 2
Greenbelt Microgreens Wheatgrass 228 g Best Before:
03/05/18*
8 90082 00035 3
Greenbelt Microgreens Wheatgrass 454 g Best Before:
30/04/18
8 90082 00036 0
Greenbelt Microgreens Spring Pea Microgreen Mix 75 g Best Before:
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00002 5
Greenbelt Microgreens Spring Pea Microgreen Mix 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
03/05/18*
8 90082 00003 9

No illnesses had been reported in relation to the recalled microgreens as of the posting of the updated recall notice.

“Check to see if you have recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased,” according to the recall notice.

Consumers with questions can contact Greenbelt Greenhouse Ltd. at 519-647-1112.

Advice to consumers
Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled microgreens and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical attention and tell their doctors about the possible exposure to the pathogen.

Also, because it can take up to 70 days after exposure for symptoms to develop, people who have eaten the recalled microgreens should monitor themselves for symptoms in the coming weeks.

Although healthy adults may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women. Other high-risk groups for serious infections that are sometimes fatal include young children, older people and anyone with a suppressed immune system.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

To view photos of all of the varieties of recalled Greenbelt Greenhouse microgreens, please click on the image.

Greenbelt Greenhouse Ltd. of Ottawa, Canada, is recalling certain Greenbelt brand microgreens because of the risk of Listeria contamination, according to an April 24 recall notice posted on The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) website.

The recalled microgreens are labeled with various expiration dates ranging from April through May of 2018, so there is concern retailers and consumers may still have the recalled product on hand.

“The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace,” according to the recall. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation which may lead to the recall of other products.

The recall notice did not provide any details about how the potential contamination was discovered, reporting only that “this recall was triggered by the company.”

The Greenbelt Microgreens were distributed throughout Alberta and British Columbia. Consumers can look for the following details to determine whether they have any of the recalled product on hand:

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
Greenbelt Microgreens Arugula Microgreens 75 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00012 4
Greenbelt Microgreens Arugula Microgreens 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00013 1
Greenbelt Microgreens Broccoli Microgreens 75 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00016 2
Greenbelt Microgreens Broccoli Microgreens 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
8 90082 00017 9
Greenbelt Microgreens Fresh Microgreen Mix 75 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00041 4
Greenbelt Microgreens Fresh Microgreen Mix 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00080 3
Greenbelt Microgreens Sweet & Crunchy Microgreen Mix 75 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00006 3
Greenbelt Microgreens Sweet & Crunchy Microgreen Mix 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00007 0
Greenbelt Microgreens Spicy Microgreen Mix 75 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00000 1
Greenbelt Microgreens Spicy Microgreen Mix 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00001 8
Greenbelt Microgreens Pea Shoots Microgreens 100 g Best Before:
26/04/18
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00023 0
Greenbelt Microgreens Pea Shoots Microgreens 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00024 7
Greenbelt Microgreens Sunflower Microgreens 100 g Best Before:
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00030 8
Greenbelt Microgreens Sunflower Microgreens 200 g Best Before:
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00031 5
Greenbelt Microgreens Wheatgrass 114 g Best Before:
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00032 2
Greenbelt Microgreens Wheatgrass 228 g Best Before:
04/05/18
8 90082 00035 3
Greenbelt Microgreens Wheatgrass 454 g Best Before:
30/04/18
8 90082 00036 0
Greenbelt Microgreens Spring Pea Microgreen Mix 75 g Best Before:
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00002 5
Greenbelt Microgreens Spring Pea Microgreen Mix 140 g Best Before:
30/04/18
04/05/18
8 90082 00003 9

No illnesses had been reported in relation to the recalled microgreens as of the posting of the recall notice.

“Check to see if you have recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased,” according to the recall notice.

Consumers with questions can contact Greenbelt Greenhouse Ltd. at 519-647-1112.

Advice to consumers
Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled microgreens and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical attention and tell their doctors about the possible exposure to the pathogen.

Also, because it can take up to 70 days after exposure for symptoms to develop, people who have eaten the recalled microgreens should monitor themselves for symptoms in the coming weeks.

Although healthy adults may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women. Other high-risk groups for serious infections that are sometimes fatal include young children, older people and anyone with a suppressed immune system.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

logo ChloroFieldsA Kansas grower is recalling “Asian Mix Microgreens” from retailers in three states because a random sample tested by the Food and Drug Administration found Salmonella bacteria in the sprouts.

The ChloroFields branded microgreens from ChloroFields of Lawrence, KS, have sell-by dates of March 26, so there is concern retailers and consumers may still have the recalled product on hand.

“The products were distributed throughout Colorado, Kansas and Missouri, and were made available through retail grocery stores,” according to the recall notice on the FDA website.

recalled ChloroFields microgreens“The product comes in a 1.5-ounce clamshell, and is identified as Asian Mix Microgreens with a sell by date of 3/26/2017. The sell by date is located on a white sticker on the bottom of the container. The UPC number of the product is 853763007096.”

Salmonella is a microscopic organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections, with high-risk groups including children, the elderly, pregnant women and anyone with a weakened immune system.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections, endocarditis and arthritis.

No illnesses had been reported in relation to the recalled sprouted greens as of Thursday. Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled microgreens and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention and tell their doctors about the possible exposure to the bacteria.

“Consumers are urged not to consume the product and to return the product to the place of purchase for a full refund. Questions may be directed to ChloroFields at 785-304-3226,” according to the recall notice.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)