Sun Hong is recalling all cases of its “Seafood” mushrooms — known as enoki mushrooms — imported from China that are packaged in 5.3-ounce packages because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. The packages do not have expiration dates.

Sun Hong Foods became aware of this issue after notification by the California Department of Public Health that samples of the product tested by the State of California were found to be positive for Listeria monocytogenes. 

Consumers who have purchased Sun Hong Foods Inc. “Seafood” mushrooms are urged to not eat it and return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.

The enoki mushrooms were distributed in California, Texas, Washington, Illinois and Florida, according to the company’s recall notice posted by the Food and Drug Administration

Retailers including Asian supermarkets may carry this brand.

The cases of mushrooms have 40 packages of 5.3-ounce/150-gram single packages

Enoki mushrooms, sometimes referred to as “seafood” mushrooms are white  with long white stems and small white convex caps. They are usually sold in clusters.

Consumers can identify the recalled enoki mushrooms by looking for the following packaging details. The affected products are sold in a clear plastic tray that is packed in green and clear plastic. “100% Natural fresh” is printed in the top right. “Mushrooms” is written in cursive and in light green in the middle. The top half or the package is clear and the bottom is dark green with a white stripe going across. “Seafood Mushroom” is printed in light green and white on the bottom half. Beneath that are instructions to keep it refrigerated and its weight of 5.3oz/150g. Additional information includes:

  • UPC 6 953150 011881
  • Brand name on the back: Sun Hong Foods, Inc
  • Sold under refrigerated conditions

As of the posting of the recall notice, there have been no illnesses reported in connection with the product.

About Listeria infections
Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any recalled mushrooms and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop.

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses.

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

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Concord Farms of Vernon, CA, is recalling enoki mushrooms, grown in Korea, because of potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination. This is the fourth enoki mushroom recall in recent days.

The recalled product was distributed from California to retail stores through produce distributors, according to the company’s recall notice posted by the Food and Drug Administration. Complete distribution details regarding what states were not provided in the company notice.

The recall notice did not include any product expiration information.

Consumers can use the following information to determine whether they have the recalled enoki mushrooms in their homes. The product is packaged in black, yellow and transparent plastic packaging, printed with the “Concord Farms” logo above “fresh enoki mushrooms.” Enoki mushrooms are white with stringy stems and small white caps. The weights of the recalled products are 5.3-ounce (150-gram) or 7-ounce (200 gram). The UPC barcode numbers are 049995041049.

As of the posting of this recall, no infections have been reported or confirmed. Consumers who have purchased the enoki mushrooms are urged to return  them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers should never eat mushrooms raw, according to the company’s recall notice. All surfaces, utensils or containers that are used for preparing mushrooms should be separated from other foods to avoid cross-contamination.

About Listeria infections
Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any recalled mushrooms and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled mushrooms should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop.

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses.

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Marquis Worldwide Specialty Inc. of City of Industry, CA, is recalling all of its “Organic Enoki Mushroom” 200-gram packages because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. 

Consumers are warned not to use the product even if it does not look or smell spoiled, according to the company’s recall notice posted by the Food and Drug Administration.

Marquis Worldwide distributed the mushrooms nationwide and they reached consumers through retail stores and produce wholesalers.

The 200-gram individual plastic packages are clear on top and orange on the bottom part. It has “Conah Organic enoki mushroom” written on the front.

“The mushroom is white and has almost no smell. As it is vegetable, it does not have a clear date of expiration,” according to the recall notice.

As of the posting of the notice no confirmed illnesses had been reported in connection with the enoki mushrooms.

“We are investigating to determine where contamination occurred. Consumers who have purchased 200g packages of ‘Conah Organic Enoki Mushroom’ are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund,” according to the company recall notice.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 626-810-6426.

About Listeria infections

Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any recalled mushrooms and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled mushrooms should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop.

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses.

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

California officials found Listeria monocytogenes in a package of enoki mushrooms from Korea, prompting a recall by Rainfield Marketing Group Inc. of Vernon, CA. 

The company shipped the mushrooms to distributors or wholesalers who distributed the product to retailers nationwide, according to a recall notice from the firm that was posted by the Food and Drug Administration.

The potential for contamination was noted after routine testing by California Department of Public Health revealed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in a 150-gram package of the mushrooms.

The distribution of the product has been suspended, according to the Rainfield recall notice.

All cases of the 150-gram packages of the company’s enoki mushrooms from Korea are subject to the recall. The plastic packages do not have any best-by or use-by dates. The company did not report what brand the mushrooms are packaged under.

To determine whether they have the recalled mushrooms in their homes, consumers should look for the following labeling on the clear and orange packages: “Enoki Mushroom” in English and labeled “Product of Korea” along with “Must be cooked enough for a minimum of 3-10 minutes at 70°C, DO NOT CONSUME RAW.” On the back left of packaging, there is UPC code 085412004020 and below Distributed by Rainfield Marketing Group, on the right a list of Nutrition Facts.

Rainfield reports no illnesses have been confirmed in relation to the recalled mushrooms.

Consumers who have purchased 150-gram packages of the implicated mushrooms are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 323-825-2825.

About Listeria infections
Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any recalled mushrooms and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled mushrooms should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop.

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses.

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning the public not to consume certain Metro Brands Enoki Mushrooms because of possible Listeria monocytogenes.

This recall comes after other Enoki mushroom recalls in the United States last month.

This warning was triggered by the CFIA’s inspection activities. The product was distributed to Quebec and possibly nationally in Canada.

Recalled products:

Brand Product Size UPC Codes
None (Packed for Metro Brands) Enoki Mushrooms 99 g 0 59749 94854 8 All units sold up to and including May 14, 2021

The CFIA advises consumers to check to see if they have the affected product in their home and not to consume it.

As of the posting of this recall, there have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

About Listeria infections
Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any recalled product and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop.

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses.

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.) 

Golden Medal Mushroom Inc. of Los Angeles is recalling all cases of its 200g/7.05-ounce packages of enoki mushrooms because of potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

This comes two days after a similar enoki mushroom recall from Guan’s Mushroom Co.

The Golden Medal recalled products were distributed to California, Illinois and Texas and through produce distributors or wholesalers to retail stores nationwide.

Recalled product:

  • The Enoki comes in a 200g/7.05ounces, clear plastic and green package with the description “Enoki Mushroom” in English and labeled “Product of Korea”. 
  • On the back, there is UPC 809165582015 on the bottom left and Golden Medal Mushroom Inc.’s name and address, along with instructions to keep refrigerated and cook through before eating.

As of the posting of this recall, there have been no illnesses reported in connection with this problem.

The distribution of the product has been suspended.

Consumers who have purchased 200g packages of Enoki are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

About Listeria infections
Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any recalled product and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop.

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses.

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Guan’s Mushroom Co. of Commerce, CA, is recalling all cases of its 200g/7.05-ounce packages of Enoki Mushroom because of potential contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes

The recalled products were distributed to retail stores nationwide from California, New York and Pennsylvania through produce distributors or wholesalers.

The recall was initiated after routine testing by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development revealed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in a 200g package of Enoki.

Recall product front

Recalled product:

  • The Enoki comes in a 200g/7.05ounces, clear plastic package with the description “Enoki Mushroom” in English, Korean and French, and Guan’s logo on the front.  
  • At the back, there is UPC code: 810023170303. 
  •  The product code is RY3428A or RY3434A in the front bottom.
  • The product is being shipped in a white cardboard box with 25 pcs of 200g.  
  • The box contains Guan’s logo in blue color and product code RY3428A or RY3434A.
Recalled product back

As of the posting of this recall, there have been no illnesses reported in connection with this problem.

The distribution of the product has been suspended.

Consumers who have purchased 200g packages of Enoki are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

About Listeria infections

Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any recalled product and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop.

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses.

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

France has become the fifth country to report Listeria in enoki mushrooms from South Korea.

It was already known that 36 people fell sick and four died in the United States from November 2016 to December 2019. Six illnesses were recorded in Canada between 2017 and 2019 and five in Australia between October 2017 and March 2020. Indonesian authorities ordered a recall of affected mushrooms from Green Co. Ltd in May but did not report any patients.

French authorities confirmed five food isolates collected in 2017 but no illnesses from enoki mushrooms from the Republic of Korea, and distributed via the Netherlands, shared the same core genome multilocus sequence typing (cgMLST) as other countries.

Implicated enoki mushrooms were distributed by one exporter to Australia, Canada, Hong Kong SAR (China), Indonesia, Myanmar, Netherlands, the Philippines, Singapore, and the U.S.

Steps to mitigate risk were taken by authorities in the Republic of Korea, such as food safety education for farmers and including a note on the pack of enoki mushrooms to alert consumers of the need to cook products before consumption.

INFOSAN second-quarter highlights
The new information comes from the International Food Safety Authorities Network’s (INFOSAN) summary of food safety events from April to June.

The network, run by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Health Organization (WHO), was involved in 29 incidents in 2Q 2020 compared to 38 in the first quarter of the year.

Of the 29 incidents, 13 were biological involving Salmonella five times, Listeria monocytogenes on three occasions, Clostridium botulinum twice, Vibrio cholera once and two for an unspecified biological hazard.

The main food categories involved were fish and other seafood, alcoholic beverages, meat products, composite food, fruit products, milk and dairy products, and cereals and cereal-based products.

Food for infants and small children, herbs, spices and condiments, nuts and oilseeds, products for special nutritional use, snacks, desserts, and other products, vegetable and vegetable products, and legumes and pulses were also mentioned in alerts.

Six incidents involved a chemical hazard – methanol three times, histamine twice, and patulin once. Five were due to an undeclared allergen including cashew and pistachio, sesame, wheat, mustard, and peanuts. Three were because of glass as a physical hazard and the other two were unspecified hazards that looked to be related to food.

Methanol poisoning cases
In the second quarter of 2020, the INFOSAN Secretariat was made aware of three methanol poisoning outbreaks in Mexico, Dominican Republic, and Cambodia. It appears outbreaks were localized and not linked in terms of the adulterated products.

“They highlight a common issue whereby fraudsters may be taking advantage of opportunities where legal alcohol sales have been restricted in order to boost their own sales. Such opportunities appear to be occurring more frequently during the COVID-19 pandemic where alcohol sales have been reduced or restricted in some jurisdictions,” according to INFOSAN.

“COVID-19 and the measures taken to mitigate the global impact of the pandemic have disrupted food production and food supply chains worldwide.”

In May and June, more than 100 deaths in Mexico were linked to drinking fraudulent alcoholic beverages adulterated with methanol. In June, it was reported that 215 fatalities and 340 cases of methanol poisoning were registered in the Dominican Republic. Three people were arrested in clandestine factories and 2,864 bottles confiscated.

A total of 43 cases and seven deaths were reported in an outbreak of methanol poisoning in Cambodia, suspected to be caused by consumption of wine.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

A California company is recalling fresh mushrooms imported from Korea after state testing returned positive results for Listeria monocytogenes.

The company, Guan’s Mushroom Co. of Commerce, CA, is recalling all cases of its 200-gram/7.05-ounce packages of enoki mushrooms, according to a recall notice posted by the Food and Drug Administration. 

Guan’s sent the implicated mushrooms to retailers in California, New York, and Pennsylvania via produce distributors or wholesalers. The company’s recall notice does not indicate if the distributors and wholesalers may have sold the product to other customers. The distribution of the product has been suspended, according to the recall notice.

Consumers can identify the recalled mushrooms by looking for 200-gram/7.05-ounce clear plastic packages with the description “Enoki Mushroom” in English, Korean and French, and Guan’s logo in the front. At the back, there is the UPC number 859267007013 and a package code of 14-1 at the lower right corner. The product is being shipped in a white cardboard box with 25 pieces of 200 grams. The boxes have Guan’s logo in green and #02473 printed on each.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with the recalled Guan’s mushrooms. However, earlier this month federal officials reported a 3-year-long listeria outbreak traced to Sun Hong Foods enoki mushrooms. 

Consumers who have purchased 200-gram packages of Guan’s enoki are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with a question may contact the company at 323-223-1188.

Established in 1996, Guan’s Mushroom has five distribution centers located in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, West Grove, and Toronto, according to the company’s website.

About Listeria infections
Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop. 

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses. 

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn or even stillbirth.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Although company officials did not report how the contamination was discovered, Marquis Worldwide Speciality Inc. is recalling its organic enoki mushrooms because of concerns about Listeria monocytogenes.

The company in Industry, CA, is warning consumers to throw away the fresh mushrooms even if they don’t look or smell spoiled, according to the firm’s recall notice posted by the Food and Drug Administration.

The recall notice states the product “does not have a clear date of expiration” because “it is a vegetable.” No identifying codes are on the packaging.

Marquis Worldwide Speciality distributed the enoki mushrooms nationwide to produce wholesalers and retailers.

The 200-gram plastic packages that are clear on the top and orange on the bottom. The packages have “Conah Organic enoki mushroom” written on the front of the packages.

The mushroom packages have the USDA’s organic seal printed on them.

According to the company, no illnesses have been reported in relation to the recalled mushrooms.

“We are investigating to determine where contamination occurred. Consumers who have purchased 200g packages of ‘Conah Organic Enoki Mushroom’ are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.” According to the recall notice. 

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 626-810-6426.

About Listeria infections
Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any recalled mushrooms and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled mushrooms should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop.

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses.

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)