An outbreak of infections from Salmonella Typhimurium is slowly growing according to the FDA, and an investigation into an outbreak of E. coli infections has been closed.

For the Salmonella outbreak, the number of patients has increased from 264 to 269, but the Food and Drug Administration has not reported the patients’ states of residence. 

The agency has begun traceback efforts but has not revealed what food or foods are being traced. The FDA has begun sample collection and analysis, but has not revealed what is being collected or sampled.

For the E. coli outbreak investigation that has been closed, the agency found 11 patients but did not identify a source for the pathogen. The FDA conducted traceback but did not reveal what food or foods were traced. The agency did not report the patients’ states of residence.

For an outbreak of infections from Listeria monocytogenes in enoki mushrooms the FDA reported that the CDC has confirmed two patients, one in Michigan and one in Nevada. Both have required hospitalization. The most recent illness onset was Nov. 15.

“Investigators are working to identify specific brands of enoki mushrooms that may be linked to these illnesses,” according to an outbreak announcement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“The true number of sick people in this outbreak is likely higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because some people recover without medical care and are not tested for Listeria.”

Also, it can take up to 70 days for symptoms to develop, and the CDC says it can take three to four weeks to determine whether a person is part of an outbreak.

Other ongoing FDA outbreak investigations

  • For a Listeria monocytogenes outbreak from Brie and Camembert cheese an Outbreak Advisory was issued on Sept. 30. Recall information was updated on Oct. 28. It reported that seven patients from six different states have been confirmed ill. Five have been hospitalized, according to the CDC.
  • For an outbreak of infections from Salmonella traced to seafood the FDA continues to work on the investigation with the CDC. A total of 33 patients in California, Illinois and Arizona have been confirmed, with 13 of them requiring hospitalization. Several varieties of seafood totaling more than 150 tons and supplied by Mariscos Bahia, Inc. have been recalled
  • The FDA has begun traceback and sample collection in an outbreak of E. coli O121:H19 linked to frozen falafel sold at Aldi stores in 36 states. At least 20 people had been confirmed sick as of Oct. 7, the date of the most recent update. Sick people have been confirmed in Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The most recent illness onset was Sept. 13.
  • An outbreak investigation continues for infections from Cronobacter in at least four infants, two of whom died. The outbreak has been determined to be over by the CDC but is it still under investigation. The babies consumed infant formula made by Abbott Nutrition’s plant in Sturgis, MI. The company says its internal tests have not found the pathogen and denies any ties to the illnesses or deaths.
Click on table to enlarge. Use link below to go to FDA page with links to specific outbreak information.

Click here to go to the FDA page with links to specific outbreak details. The investigations are in a variety of stages. Some outbreaks have limited information with active investigations ongoing, others may be near completion.

public health advisory will be issued for investigations that have resulted in specific, actionable steps for consumers to take to protect themselves, according to the FDA. Please direct your attention to those pages for the most up-to-date information on the investigation and for consumer protection information.

Outbreak and adverse event investigations that do not result in specific, actionable steps for consumers may or may not conclusively identify a source or reveal any contributing factors. Adverse event investigations rely on self-reported data. Although these reports may name a particular product, FDA will only indicate a product category in the table and will not publicly name a specific product until there is sufficient evidence to implicate that product as a cause of illnesses or adverse events. If a cause and/or contributing factors are identified that could inform future prevention, FDA commits to providing a summary of those findings.

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Mariscos Bahia Inc. is recalling over 300,000 pounds of salmon, halibut, seabass, tuna and swordfish because of possible Salmonella contamination.

Products were distributed to 179 retail customers located in Arizona and California, primarily to restaurants.

According to the Food and Drug Administration, the recall was initiated on Oct. 20, and is ongoing.

Recalled products:

#Product DescriptionRecall NumberClassificationCode InformationProduct Quantity
1Fresh Salmon fillets packed in 10-50 lb. corrugated cardboard or Styrofoam boxesF-0083-2023Class IProduct code: SALFFS89,953 lbs
2Halibut (fillets and portions) packed in 10-50 lb. corrugated cardboard or Styrofoam boxesF-0084-2023Class IProduct code: HALL, HALP, HALP85,718.23 lbs.
3Chilean Seabass (fillets and portions) packed in 10-50 lb. corrugated cardboard or Styrofoam boxesF-0085-2023Class IProduct code: SEA003, SEA0043,307.89 lbs
4Tuna (fillet and loins) packed in 10-50 lb. corrugated cardboard or Styrofoam boxesF-0086-2023Class IProduct code: TUN0033,998.28 lbs
5Swordfish (loins, fillets, and Wheels) packed in 10-50 lb. corrugated cardboard or Styrofoam boxesF-0087-2023Class IProduct Code: SWF, SWF012,685.77 lbs
6Fresh Salmon Fillet Portions (6,7,8,9,10 oz.) packed in 10-50 lb. corrugated cardboard or Styrofoam boxesF-0088-2023Class IProduct Code: SALPFS179,002.40 lbs.
7Fresh Salmon Deep Skin Fillets packed in 10-50 lb. corrugated cardboard or Styrofoam boxesF-0089-2023Class IProduct Code: SALFDS40,338.15 lbs

About Salmonella infections
Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled fish and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop a severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

Some people get infected without getting sick or showing any symptoms. However, they may still spread the infections to others.

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The FDA is continuing to investigate several foodborne illness outbreaks and has added a new one to its list.

As of Oct. 26, there had been 10 patients confirmed in the new outbreak of infections from E. coli O157:H7. The Food and Drug Administration has initiated traceback but has not reported what food or foods are being traced.

In other outbreak news, the FDA has issued an outbreak advisory for an outbreak of infections from Salmonella Litchfield in seafood. As of this past week, there were 33 confirmed patients in the outbreak. The FDA has been investigating the outbreak since late September and has traced the implicated fish to Mariscos Bahia Inc.

For two multistate outbreaks from the Cyclospora cayetanensis parasite, one with 84 patients and the other with 43, the FDA is reporting that sick people said they ate a variety of leafy greens before becoming ill. The FDA has closed both investigations. 

“For both investigations, CDC, FDA, and state and local partners conducted epidemiologic and traceback investigations and collected and analyzed the product and environmental samples. All samples collected were reported as negative for Cyclospora. Due to the lack of additional detail in the epidemiological data and the absence of supporting evidence collected from traceback and sample collection, FDA could not identify a specific product as the source of either outbreak,” according to an FDA update on the two outbreaks.

The FDA has closed investigations on two other outbreaks.

One of the outbreaks, from Salmonella Senftenberg, sickened 36 people. The FDA did not identify a source for Salmonella and the outbreak is considered over.

The other outbreak investigation has closely involved frozen crumbles sold under the Daily Harvest brand. The leek and lentil crumbles were associated with 393 consumer complaints of various illnesses including liver, bile duct, and gallbladder issues. At least 133 people were hospitalized and at least 25 patients reported they had to have their gallbladders removed. One possible source of the illnesses was tara flour used in the crumbles, but the FDA did not find a definitive link. The most recent person to become sick had symptoms begin on Sept. 4. 

Ongoing outbreak investigations

  • For a Listeria monocytogenes outbreak from Brie and Camembert cheese an Outbreak Advisory was issued on Sept. 30. It reported that six patients from six different states have been confirmed ill. Five have been hospitalized, according to the CDC.
  • The FDA has begun traceback and sample collection in an outbreak of E. coli O121:H19 linked to frozen falafel sold at Aldi stores in 36 states. At least 20 people had been confirmed sick as of Oct. 7. Sick people have been confirmed in Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The most recent illness onset was Sept. 13.
  • The FDA is conducting an on-site inspection at Big Olaf Creamery in Florida, which has been deemed to be behind an 11-state outbreak of Listeria infections. The state of Florida closed the business several weeks ago after tests found multiple places of contamination with Listeria monocytogenes in the plant. Testing also showed Listeria in 16 of 17 flavors of the company’s ice cream. At last count, the outbreak had sickened 25 patients with one having died. A pregnant woman also miscarried. Twenty-four of the patients have required hospitalization.
  • An outbreak of infections from Cronobacter in at least four infants, two of whom died. The outbreak has been determined to be over by the CDC but is it still under investigation. The babies consumed infant formula made by Abbott Nutrition’s plant in Sturgis, MI.
Click on the table to enlarge it. Use the link below to go to the FDA page with links to specific outbreak information.

Click here to go to the page with links to specific outbreaks.

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More than 30 people have been confirmed sick in an outbreak of Salmonella Litchfield infections traced to fresh raw salmon.

Of the 33 patients, 16 have completed interviews with health officials and 12 of those reported eating sushi, sashimi, or poke. Thirteen of the 33 patients have been so sick that they had to be admitted to hospitals, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Food and Drug Administration has been investigating the outbreak since late September and has traced the implicated fish to Mariscos Bahia Inc. The FDA found multiple environmental samples from the company’s Pico Rivera, CA, distribution center to be contaminated with Salmonella. Some of the fish could have been sent to the Mariscos Bahia Inc. facilities in Phoenix, AZ, and then sent to restaurants.

There has not been a recall. According to Mariscos Bahia Inc., seafood was only sold directly to restaurants in California and Arizona and would not be available for purchase by consumers in stores.

“While epidemiological evidence indicates that ill people consumed fresh, raw salmon processed at this firm, the presence of Salmonella in the processing environment indicates that additional types of fish processed in the same area of the facility could also be contaminated which includes fresh, raw halibut, Chilean seabass, tuna, and swordfish,” according to the FDA.

The salmon was supplied to restaurants in California and Arizona. There are 21 patients in California, 11 in Arizona and one in Illinois. The most recent illness onset was Sept. 18.

The FDA recommends that restaurants check with their suppliers and not sell or serve fresh salmon, halibut, Chilean seabass, tuna, and swordfish received fresh, not frozen from Mariscos Bahia Inc. distribution centers in Pico Rivera, CA, and Phoenix, AZ.

“If restaurants received these fish and then froze it, they should not sell or serve it. Restaurants should also be sure to wash and sanitize locations where these fish from Mariscos Bahia, Inc. were stored or prepared, adoring to the FDA.

“Consumers eating salmon, halibut, Chilean seabass, tuna, and swordfish at a restaurant in California or Arizona should ask whether the fish is from Mariscos Bahia, Inc and was received fresh, not frozen.”

About Salmonella infections
Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop a severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

Some people get infected without getting sick or showing any symptoms. However, they may still spread the infections to others.

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