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USDA delays GMO regs — WHO urges caution with animal antibiotics — Food safety for diabetics

Every hour of every day people around the world are living with and working to resolve food safety issues. Here is a sampling of current headlines for your consumption, brought to you today with the support of iwaspoisoned.com. Food safety tips for diabetics As November is National Diabetes Month, practicing safe food handling to prevent foodborne illness is in the… Continue Reading

E. coli consensus is goal of top scientists meeting at Penn State

Some of the world’s top scientists are gathering at Penn State next week for an invitation-only workshop to discuss how to reach a consensus on techniques to identify new serotypes of E. coli. Penn State’s 50-year-old E. coli Reference Center is hosting the international meeting. “We hope the workshop here can lead to a consensus,” said… Continue Reading

Food safety reprieve: Ag secretary pauses plan to move Codex

Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, for the moment, has backed off his controversial plan to transfer the U.S. Codex Office, which works on international food standards, from USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service to a new trade office in the department. In a letter to Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, R-KS, Perdue said there are two… Continue Reading

WGS could be WMD in global battle against foodborne illness

Opinion

Editor’s note: This column by FDA’s Steven Musser and Eric L. Stevens was originally published on the agency’s blog. FDA is laying the foundation for the use of whole genome sequencing (WGS) to protect consumers from foodborne illness in countries all over the world. We recently traveled to Geneva to join a meeting of the Codex… Continue Reading

Deaths of in the Solomon Islands Associated With Rotavirus Epidemic

Update:  The government of the Solomon Island provided Food Safety News with more information on the health emergency they are facing.   Here is that statement: “The Ministry of Health and Medical Services (MHMS) would like to clarify that while six deaths have been reported during the diarrhea outbreak, the cause of death of each individual… Continue Reading

2015 in Review: Animal Antibiotics

It’s difficult to summarize what happened on the animal antibiotics front this year. There were lots of pledges, lots of discussions and lots of reports, but not very many actions. Still, we still wanted to recap what happened in the 2015 regarding animal antibiotics. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that antibiotic-resistant infections… Continue Reading

WHO Releases First Global Estimates of Foodborne Disease

1 in 10 sickened annually around the world each year

About one in every 10 people around the world is sickened by foodborne disease each year. Of those 600 million people, 420,000 die as a result. These numbers are the first global estimates — conservative ones  — of foodborne illnesses and were calculated by the World Health Organization (WHO). The comprehensive report, published Thursday, Dec. 3, incorporated… Continue Reading

First World Antibiotic Awareness Week Focuses on Education

This week, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the governments of several countries want people to learn more about antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health today, and, while it occurs naturally, misuse of antibiotics in humans and animals accelerates the process. Monday kicked off the first World Antibiotic Awareness… Continue Reading

Letter From the Editor: ‘Super’ Weeds and the C-Word

Opinion

A couple of weeks ago, when I found myself putting a few thousand miles on a new truck in the upper Midwest, I forgot to take enough music along to cover all that distance. That left no choice but to turn to the AM radio, where there are three options: religious, public and farm. I… Continue Reading

2011 Outbreak of Rare E. Coli Strain was Costly for Europe

The World Health Organization (WHO) has totaled up some economic costs of the 2011 outbreak of the rare and deadly E. coli O104:H4 centered on Northern Europe. Farmers and industries lost $1.3 billion, and emergency aid provided to 22 European states cost another $236 million, according to WHO. The novel E. coli strain was the… Continue Reading