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Food Safety News

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tempeh

Meat substitutes: Safer and just as tasty as the real thing?

Portland, OR — On a recent rainy evening, Native Foods Cafe in Bridgeport Village was bustling. Customers crowded around the counter to order burgers, nachos, chicken wings and other dishes, and people were happily digging in after being served. The “Soul Bowl,” a mélange of beans, rice and veggies, had what looked and tasted like… Continue Reading

Tempeh Salmonella Case Highlights Illnesses that Fall through the Cracks

Stopping at a café during a trip to Asheville, North Carolina with family this past March, Mary Ann Hurtado decided to order a veggie sandwich while everyone else chose something with meat. It was a choice she regularly made — she’s not a vegetarian by any means, but she does love vegetables. But less than… Continue Reading

Lawsuit Filed in Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Unpasteurized Tempeh

The first lawsuit has been filed against the North Carolina tempeh producer and the online spore culture retailer responsible for a Salmonella outbreak that sickened at least 89 people in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and New York earlier this year. The lawsuit was filed jointly by Asheville, NC law firm Roberts & Stevens and… Continue Reading

Publisher’s Platform: Trouble with Imports

Opinion

When Smiling Hara Tempeh’s managing executive Chad Oliphant began buying starter culture from Maryland-based Tempeh Online to make the popular bean product tempeh, he surely did not expect it to be contaminated with Salmonella (or anything else for that matter).  And, why should he? Like most people in his position, I imagine Mr. Oliphant was… Continue Reading

Tempeh Starter Linked to Outbreak Recalled

A Rockville, MD company is recalling its Tempeh Starter Yeast and Super Starter Yeast because the products may be contaminated with Salmonella. The tempeh starter, a fungal culture imported from Indonesia and sold over the Internet, has been linked to an outbreak of Salmonella Paratyphi B infection that has sickened 88 people, 64 of them… Continue Reading

Salmonella Paratyphi B Outbreak Grows

The Salmonella Paratyphi B case-count associated with contaminated starter culture used in raw tempeh products sold by Smiling Hara, an Asheville, NC-based company, continued to grow last week, with the number of Salmonella Paratyphi B cases reaching 83 on Friday.  According to the Asheville Citzen-Times, 62 of the cases were counted among residents of Bruncombe… Continue Reading

Smiling Hara Tempeh Salmonella Outbreak

  63 people in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and New York have fallen ill from a rare strain of Salmonella linked to spore culture used to make unpasteurized tempeh by North Carolina food producer Smiling Hara. The outbreak strain of Salmonella Paratyphi B was originally thought to be a typhoidal strain, the type that… Continue Reading

Spore Culture Pinpointed as Tempeh Salmonella Contaminant

North Carolina’s Department of Public Health laboratory confirmed on Thursday that the ongoing Salmonella Paratyphi B outbreak linked to Smiling Hara unpasteurized tempeh was caused by contaminated packages of spore culture used in the product’s fermentation process. At least 63 people in four states have been sickened in this outbreak. According to the Buncombe County… Continue Reading

Tempeh Salmonella Cases Increase From 46 to 60

North Carolina’s Buncombe County reported Monday that the number of Salmonella Paratyphi B cases in an outbreak linked to unpasteurized tempeh has risen from 46 to 60.  As Food Safety News reported last week, the rare type of Salmonella was traced to tempeh, a fermented soy bean product made by a small local producer, Smiling… Continue Reading

Rare Salmonella Paratyphi Outbreak Linked to Unpasteurized Tempeh

Update (May 10, 2:00 p.m. Eastern): North Carolina’s Department of Public Health laboratory confirmed on Thursday that the ongoing Salmonella Paratyphi B outbreak linked to Smiling Hara unpasteurized tempeh was caused by contaminated packages of spore culture used in the product’s fermentation process. At least 63 people in four states have been sickened in this outbreak…. Continue Reading