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Food Safety News

Breaking news for everyone's consumption


McGill Food Safety Team Gets $10 Million for Salmonella Research


A food safety team at Montreal’s McGill University has been awarded $10 million for a study intended to answer remaining questions about Salmonella and how food growers can better prevent its contamination. The research team, led by McGill Food Safety Associate Professor Lawrence Goodridge, Ph.D., will first sequence the genomes of 4,500 isolates from the 2,500 known Salmonella serotypes —… Continue Reading

Scientists Learn How Listeria Grows on Refrigerated Smoked Salmon


One of the dangers of Listeria monocytogenes is that it can grow on food even in the cold temperatures of the refrigerator, although it does grow more slowly at 40 degrees F or less. Studying how foodborne pathogens adapt in different foods and storage conditions could help scientists develop more efficient control strategies and growth inhibitors. One… Continue Reading

Chicken Flock Study on Salmonella Transmission Makes Novel Discovery


Despite Salmonella being the most common illness-causing foodborne bacteria in the U.S. food system, still very little is known about the precise processes through which the bacterium contaminates and transmits among its most pervasive carriers: chickens. New research from the University of Arkansas, however, is aiming to bridge the gap in knowledge about how Salmonella infects such a large percentage… Continue Reading

Study Finds Some Breast Milk Sold Online is Diluted with Cow’s Milk


The practice of buying breast milk online has gained significant traction in recent years, as more parents who can’t produce enough breast milk on their own turn to nursing mothers on the Internet to fill the need. But some breast milk purchased online might be topped off with cow’s milk, which could cause allergic reactions… Continue Reading

Study: Peanuts May Help to Ward Off Some Foodborne Illnesses


Eating the skinless inner kernels of peanuts may improve a person’s gut biota and its ability to ward off E. coli and Salmonella, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland published in the Journal of Food Science. The findings suggest that skinless peanuts could be a beneficial promoter of gut bacteria that will outcompete… Continue Reading

Test Uses Low-Tech Litmus Paper to Detect E. Coli


Litmus paper, long known as a low-tech method of testing substances for acidity, might have a new use as a cheap, quick way to test for E. coli, according to researchers at McMaster University in Ontario. The researchers correlated levels of E. coli bacteria with pH values represented by the colors to which the litmus… Continue Reading

WHO Study Measures Global Burden of Listeria


In 2010, Listeria monocytogenes was estimated to infect 23,150 people worldwide. It killed 5,463 of them, or 23.6 percent, according to a new study by European researchers in the World Health Organization (WHO) published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. The researchers say that an urgent effort is needed to fill in information on Listeria infections… Continue Reading

Researchers Uncover Clues in the Fight Against Listeria


Listeria monocytogenes has long been one of the most fearsome foodborne pathogens. With a high mortality rate and the ability to grow at refrigerator temperatures, it’s also one of the most adaptable. Now, researchers in Denmark say they’ve made some important discoveries that explain why the bug is difficult to fight, according to Medical News… Continue Reading

E. Coli Protein Study Could Help Advance Detection, Treatment


E. coli has earned its reputation as a deadly pathogen lurking in contaminated foods, but a multi-year study may give it some positive press as a source of medical knowledge and potential therapeutics. Researchers at Kansas State University are studying a protein secreted by E. coli bacteria that blocks functions of the body’s innate immune… Continue Reading

Study: Raw and Pasteurized Milk Differ in Taste, Smell and Safety


Belgian researchers have not exactly said the benefits of raw milk often cited by advocates exist only in their heads, but they’ve come pretty close. They’ve found that the only big difference between pasteurized and non-pasteurized milk is “organoleptic,” meaning how it tastes, smells, feels or appears. Their conclusion: raw milk is a “realistic and… Continue Reading