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Chicken Flock Study on Salmonella Transmission Makes Novel Discovery

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Despite Salmonella being the most common illness-causing foodborne bacteria in the U.S. food system, still very little is known about the precise processes through which the bacterium contaminates and transmits among its most pervasive carriers: chickens. New research from the University of Arkansas, however, is aiming to bridge the gap in knowledge about how Salmonella infects such a large percentage… Continue Reading

Study Finds Some Breast Milk Sold Online is Diluted with Cow’s Milk

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The practice of buying breast milk online has gained significant traction in recent years, as more parents who can’t produce enough breast milk on their own turn to nursing mothers on the Internet to fill the need. But some breast milk purchased online might be topped off with cow’s milk, which could cause allergic reactions… Continue Reading

Study: Peanuts May Help to Ward Off Some Foodborne Illnesses

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Eating the skinless inner kernels of peanuts may improve a person’s gut biota and its ability to ward off E. coli and Salmonella, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland published in the Journal of Food Science. The findings suggest that skinless peanuts could be a beneficial promoter of gut bacteria that will outcompete… Continue Reading

Test Uses Low-Tech Litmus Paper to Detect E. Coli

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Litmus paper, long known as a low-tech method of testing substances for acidity, might have a new use as a cheap, quick way to test for E. coli, according to researchers at McMaster University in Ontario. The researchers correlated levels of E. coli bacteria with pH values represented by the colors to which the litmus… Continue Reading

WHO Study Measures Global Burden of Listeria

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In 2010, Listeria monocytogenes was estimated to infect 23,150 people worldwide. It killed 5,463 of them, or 23.6 percent, according to a new study by European researchers in the World Health Organization (WHO) published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. The researchers say that an urgent effort is needed to fill in information on Listeria infections… Continue Reading

Researchers Uncover Clues in the Fight Against Listeria

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Listeria monocytogenes has long been one of the most fearsome foodborne pathogens. With a high mortality rate and the ability to grow at refrigerator temperatures, it’s also one of the most adaptable. Now, researchers in Denmark say they’ve made some important discoveries that explain why the bug is difficult to fight, according to Medical News… Continue Reading

E. Coli Protein Study Could Help Advance Detection, Treatment

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E. coli has earned its reputation as a deadly pathogen lurking in contaminated foods, but a multi-year study may give it some positive press as a source of medical knowledge and potential therapeutics. Researchers at Kansas State University are studying a protein secreted by E. coli bacteria that blocks functions of the body’s innate immune… Continue Reading

Study: Raw and Pasteurized Milk Differ in Taste, Smell and Safety

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Belgian researchers have not exactly said the benefits of raw milk often cited by advocates exist only in their heads, but they’ve come pretty close. They’ve found that the only big difference between pasteurized and non-pasteurized milk is “organoleptic,” meaning how it tastes, smells, feels or appears. Their conclusion: raw milk is a “realistic and… Continue Reading

New Study Ties Higher Rate of MRSA Infections to Living Near Swine Operations

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Pennsylvania residents living near pig farms or fields fertilized with pig manure were up to 38 percent more likely to acquire infections of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA, according to a new study by researchers from the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Geisinger’s Henry Hood Center for Health Research. The… Continue Reading

Scientists Debate New Study on GMO-Fed Pigs

Study highlights issue of GM seed research restrictions

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Science commentators involved in the genetically modified food debate have weighed in on a new study that says pigs fed genetically modified grains suffered a higher rate of severe stomach inflammation and developed heavier uteri. Some experts have said the study shows evidence of a problem that warrants further study, while others have dismissed it… Continue Reading