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raw eggs

Lower Salmonella rate results in new U.K. advice on raw eggs

Benefits of eating raw or lightly cooked eggs from British hens now exceed the risks, according to the Food Standards Agency (FSA) for the United Kingdom. Therefore, FSA has changed its official advice, which previously warned infants, children, pregnant women and the elderly against eating eggs that had not been thoroughly cooked. The revised advice, based… Continue Reading

Tips to help expectant moms safely ring in the New Year

Contributed

Editor’s note: This column by Luis Delgadillo of the food safety education staff at the USDA’s Food Safety Inspection Service was first published by USDA on Dec. 22. Most expectant mothers know about the dangers of consuming alcohol while pregnant and opt for sparkling juices instead of champaign to toast the New Year. But, many… Continue Reading

Baking this weekend? Just say no to the raw dough

Contributed

Editor’s note: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention originally published this article on Nov. 22. For many people, the holiday season is the perfect time to spend time together in the kitchen and share delicious baked foods and desserts. Follow these safety tips to help you and your loved ones stay healthy when handling… Continue Reading

Criminal Trial Delayed in Australian Outbreak Linked to Raw Egg Mayonnaise

A criminal trial involving a Salmonella outbreak which sickened more than 160 people in Australia in May 2013 has been delayed until February 2016. The trial was delayed in order to acquire more expert evidence, sources told a Canberra newspaper. The outbreak was reportedly linked to raw egg mayonnaise served in potato salad at the Copa… Continue Reading

Why Most Americans Refrigerate Raw Shell Eggs and Europeans Often Don’t

American travelers to Europe may have noticed that people “across the pond” often store raw shell eggs at room temperature. They can safely do that because of the way eggs are produced in Europe, but it can’t be safely done in the U.S. because of Salmonella. Salmonella bacteria, discovered in 1885 and named for the… Continue Reading