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mad cow disease

USDA says mad cow case in Alabama is ‘atypical’ and not risky

An 11-year old cow in Alabama is the fifth case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) to be found in the United States since 2003, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced late on Tuesday. The non-scientific name for BSE is mad cow disease, a prion disease that reached epidemic levels in Great Britain in the late… Continue Reading

EU scientists investigate origin of isolated BSE cases

Two decades have passed since the Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic struck Europe. Commonly known as mad cow disease, BSE remains without a cure and, after a long incubation period of 2 to 5 years, is completely fatal due to the spongiform degeneration of the brain and spiral cord. Europe’s 1986-1998 BSE epidemic was primary… Continue Reading

China to lift ban on US beef instituted after 2003 BSE incident

Chinese officials say they will lift a ban on U.S. beef imports imposed in 2003 after a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, also known as BSE or mad cow disease, was confirmed in a Washington state cow imported from Canada. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack called Thursday’s announcement “a critical first step” following a recently concluded review of the… Continue Reading

‘Surprising’ Discovery Made About Chronic Wasting Disease

New study shows that prions can bind to plants

An infectious brain disease that has been killing deer, elk and moose both in the wild and on “captive farms” continues to stalk the land, expanding its domain to 23 states and two Canadian provinces since it was first identified in captive mule deer in a Colorado research facility in 1967. Known as chronic wasting disease,… Continue Reading

Canadian BSE Case Demonstrates Need for COOL, Lobby Group Says

R-CALF USA, which represents the U.S. cattle industry in trade, marketing and private property rights issues, is pointing to a recent case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) — or, as it is commonly called, “mad cow disease” — in a Canadian cow as a reason to maintain country-of-origin labeling (COOL). The World Trade Organization (WTO)… Continue Reading

Norway Detects Country’s First Case of ‘Mad Cow Disease’

Officials in Norway have announced that nation’s first-ever case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the neurological disease in cattle more commonly known as “mad cow disease,” according to Reuters. The disease was found in a 15-year-old cow that had been slaughtered for food, but no portion of the cow reached the consumer food system. The… Continue Reading

New Rules on Beef Imports Regarding ‘Mad Cow Disease’ Set for March

Federal rules on beef imported into the U.S. will change beginning March 4, when importers begin operating under new, more open rules regarding bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the fatal disease in cattle more commonly known as “Mad Cow Disease.” The new rules aim to bring the U.S. guidelines for imports in regard to BSE more… Continue Reading

Germany Identifies First ‘Mad Cow’ Case Since 2009

German officials have identified one beef cow with a case of bovine spongiform encephalitis (BSE), the fatal neurological disorder also known as “Mad Cow Disease.” This is Germany’s first reported case since 2009. The cow was killed and its body destroyed, with none of the meat entering the human food chain. Health officials said that… Continue Reading

USDA Eases Regulations on Beef Imports in Regard to ‘Mad Cow Disease’

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its final ruling late Friday afternoon easing regulations on beef imports in regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the fatal disease in cattle also known as “Mad Cow Disease.” The new rule will bring the United States’ stance on beef imports in line with international standards that base trade… Continue Reading

FDA Seeks Comment on Risk of BSE in Cow Intestines

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reopened the comment period for its rule on what cow parts may be used in human products Monday because research completed since the interim rule was published has revealed traces of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in parts of the intestine currently allowed in human food and drugs. In 2005,… Continue Reading