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Recall in another country triggers seed mix recall in Canada

Canadian officials report that Puresource Inc. is recalling a three-seed sprouting mix, packaged under the Now Real Food brand, because it may be contaminated with Salmonella.

No illnesses have been confirmed in Canada in relation to the “Zesty Sprouting Mix,” according to the recall notice posted by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). 

“This recall was triggered by a recall in another country. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products,” the notice says. Canadian officials did not specify where the other recall had occurred.

Information supplied by Puresource did not include any date codes. However, seed mixes are shelf stable and can have best-by dates well into the future. Public health officials in Canada are concerned that consumers could still have the recalled sprouting mix in their homes.

The CFIA is urging people to check their homes for the recalled seed mix, which includes radish, fenugreek and cover seeds, for the recalled Now Real Food product. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased, CFIA recommends.

Labeling details that consumers can use to identify the recalled seed mix are as follows:

  • Now Real Food Zesty Sprouting Mix made with clover, fenugreek and radish seeds;
  • packaged in 454-gram plastic bags;
  • Lot number 3031259 or Lot number 3038165;
  • UPC number of 7 33739 07271 9; and 
  • The Non-GMO Project logo.

“Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick,” according to the recall notice. “Young children, pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems may contract serious and sometimes deadly infections.”

Anyone who has developed symptoms of Salmonella infection after eating the recalled Zesty Sprouting Mix should seek medical attention and tell their doctors about their possible exposure to the bacteria. Specific tests are required to diagnose and treat Salmonella infections.

Symptoms can include fever, headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal cramps and diarrhea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

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