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Whole frozen chickens recalled due to Salmonella risk

The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) announced that a meat processor in Sealy, TX, is recalling  2,300 whole frozen chickens because of a risk of Salmonella contamination.

Texas All Grass-Fed, the processor, failed to properly document steps taken to prevent or eliminate bacterial contamination from the chickens, or document that the birds were properly cooled after processing, according to a news release.

The recalled whole chickens were packaged in plastic bags. In addition to being sold at the processor’s storefront in Sealy, the chickens were distributed throughout Houston, Dallas and Austin areas.

Although no illnesses have been reported in connection to the recalled products, the DSHS is urging the public to toss out the recalled chicken, or return it to the point of sale.

Advice to consumers
Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection, but infants, children, seniors and those with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are more fragile, according to the state health agency.

Most people who become ill from a Salmonella infection will recover fully after a few days. It is possible for some people to be infected with the bacteria and not get sick or show any symptoms, but still be able to spread the infection to others.

Anyone who has eaten any of the whole, frozen chicken products and developed symptoms of  Salmonella infection should seek medical attention and tell their doctors about the possible exposure to the bacteria.

Symptoms of a Salmonella infection, called salmonellosis, typically start 6 to 72 hours after exposure to Salmonella bacteria, but in some people it takes two weeks for symptoms to develop. Symptoms include fever, chills, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, headache, nausea and vomiting. These symptoms usually last for four to seven days.

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