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UPDATE: Multiple E. Coli Strains Prompt Beef Recall

The product was distributed to certain Brookshire Food Stores, Krogers and Walmarts in Louisiana and Texas, as well as certain Super 1 Foods Stores in Louisiana and Market Latina and Super 1 Foods Stores in Texas.

PFP Enterprises in Fort Worth, TX, is recalling approximately 15,865 pounds of beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O103, E. coli O111, E. coli O121, E. coli O145, E. coli O26 and E. coli O45.

The following products are being recalled:

  • 10.5-lb. boxes of Beef Outside Skirt Steak, with a pack date of “12/13/13”
  • 20-lb. boxes of Studio Movie Grill Beef Tenderloin Sliced, with a pack date of “12/05/13”
  • 15-lb. boxes of Preseasoned Beef for Fajita, with a use by date of “1/13/14”
  • 40-lb. boxes of Southwest Style Beef Skirts, with a pack date of “12/5/13”
  • 20-lb. boxes of Patterson Food Processors Beef Skirt Seasoned, with a pack date of “12/9/13”
  • 10-lb. boxes of Preseasoned Beef for Fajitas, with a pack date of “12/9/2013”
  • 40-lb. boxes of Preseasoned Beef for Fajitas w/Binder, with a pack date of “12/9/2013”
  • 12-lb. boxes of Seasoned Beef for Fajitas, containing 6 2-lb. packs, with a use by date of “1/15/14”
  • 12-lb. boxes of Mexican Style Beef for Fajita, containing 6 2-lb. packs, with a use by date of “1/11/14”

The products subject to recall bear the establishment number “Est. 34715” inside the USDA Mark of Inspection. The products were produced on Dec. 5, 2013, and distributed to retail stores and restaurants in Arizona, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico and Texas.

USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS)  personnel became aware of the problem during a Food Safety Assessment when they discovered that beef trim tested presumptive positive for multiple non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains through the company’s testing program. The company inadvertently did not carry the test out to confirmation, and not all affected product was held.

FSIS and the company have received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products.

Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 STEC, such as STEC O26, O103, O45, O111, O121 or O145, because it is harder to identify than STEC O157. People can become ill from STECs 2-8 days (average of 3-4 days) after consuming the organism. Most people infected with STEC O26, O103, O45, O111, O121 or O145 develop diarrhea (often bloody) and vomiting. Some illnesses last longer and can be more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by testing of a stool sample. Vigorous rehydration and other supportive care is the usual treatment; antibiotic treatment is generally not recommended.

Most people recover within a week, but, rarely, some develop a more severe infection. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is uncommon with STEC O26, O103, O45, O111, O121 or O145 infection. HUS can occur in people of any age, but is most common in children younger than five years old, older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

© Food Safety News
  • Oginikwe

    Thank god this meat was USDA inspected or it might be contaminated with something.
    Oh, wait . . .

  • Teal Manning

    Yeah so we got the USDA . And then we have the stink heads who did this,
    Sure reducing government would really reduce problems like these right?
    NOoo.