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Tyson Recalls Breaded Chicken Snacks Bagged Incorrectly

Late Wednesday, Tyson Foods, Inc. announced a recall of approximately 67,269 pounds of packages labeled as Honey BBQ Flavored Boneless Chicken Wyngz for misbranding and undeclared allergens.

The action is a Class I recall, meaning that there is a high public health risk.

The Arkansas-based meat company said its Buffalo Style Boneless Chicken Wyngz were packaged in bags meant for Honey BBQ Flavored Boneless Chicken Wyngz and contain the allergens milk, soy and egg, which are not declared on the Honey BBQ Flavored Boneless Chicken Wyngz label.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) the recalled Tyson product subject to recall incldues:

• 25.5 oz. (1.59 lb.) bags of “Tyson any’tizers Boneless Chicken Wyngz Honey BBQ Flavored.” Each bag bears the USDA mark of inspection. The establishment number “P13456” and the use by date “Aug 072013” or “Aug 082013” are ink-jetted on the back of the bags.

• 12.75 lb. shipping cases of “Fully Cooked Boneless Chicken Wyngz Buffalo Style.” Each case bears the USDA mark of inspection. The establishment number “P13456” and the use by date “Aug 07 2013” or “Aug 08 2013” are ink-jetted on the cases. Identifying case codes “2202PBF0208:xx” through “2202PBF0223:xx” or “2212PBF0200:xx” through “2212PBF0223:xx,” where the last four digits represent hours and minutes (“xx”) in military time, also can be found ink-jetted on cases subject to recall.

The chicken products were produced on Aug. 7 and Aug. 8, 2012, and were distributed to retail stores nationwide. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website.

Tyson Foods, located in Pine Bluff, learned about the problem through customer complaints.

Neither USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service – which regulates meat products – nor Tyson have received reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of this product. The USDA agency will conduct effectiveness checks to make sure the product is removed from the market.

Anyone experiencing an allergic reaction should seek medical treatment.

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