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Food Safety News

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Pet Treats Recalled After Colorado Finds Salmonella Contamination

Pets and their human handlers could be at risk from a recalled called American Beef Bully Sticks produced under the Boots & Barkley name by Denver-based Kasel Associated Industries.

The 5-inch sticks come in a 6-count package. Humans are at risk from handling the sticks and not washing their hands. No illnesses have yet been associated with the recall.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. Any pet has consumed the recalled product and has any of these signs, should be taken to a veterinarian.

The recalled American Beef Bully Sticks were distributed nationwide through Target retail stores from April through September 2012.

The product comes in a clear plastic bag containing 6 bully sticks marked with bar code number 647263899189.

Kasel Industries is recalling all lot numbers because the following lot codes tested positive through analysis by the Colorado Department of Agriculture: BESTBY20APR2014DEN, BESTBY01JUN2014DEN, BESTBY23JUN2014DEN, and BESTBY23SEP2014DEN.

The Colorado Department of Agriculture discovered the Salmonella contamination through routine testing.

The company has ceased the production and distribution of the product while FDA and the company continue investigating as to the source of the contamination.

Consumers may return the recalled product to the place where they were purchased for a full refund.

Consumers with questions may contact Kasel Associated Industries at 1-800-218-4417 Monday thru Friday from 7am to 5pm MDT.

© Food Safety News
  • Lynne Zeigler

    How many pets have to get sick from treats including things like Waggin’ Train or Milo’s before the FDA tells stores to pull those treats off of the shelves? One local store is even advertising Milo’s in its sale flyers. Even some vets have not heard of the possibility of Fanconi Syndrome. I only knew because of doing my own research online about pet food and treats that some of the treats might be bad for my rescue dog. Last I knew, the FDA was outsourcing the investigation of such treats and it could be quite some time before that work is done. My dog has had many ailments and I started doing research online to try to determine potential sources and was absolutely appalled to discover I had been giving him Milo’s and Waggin’ Train treats for at least one year before I discovered the potential for Fanconi Syndrome online. Not everyone has a computer, or does their own research online. I have actually told customers at stores that they should stay away from those particular treats. I have bought treats that are unopened and will not give to my dog because they are made in China.

  • Stephanie

    I used to give my dog WagginTrain too. I just try to stick to ONE brand from now on. It’s a little more costly, but they donate to shelters and it lessens my worries since they have no reported problems that I’m aware of. Science Diet makes foods, snacks and other things. If I go offbrand, I just try to keep it made in USA. Sometimes, this isnt always the case (problems with foods made outside of USA), but seems less likely to happen. Spend the extra money on our furry bffs. They’re sooooo worth every penny.