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More Cases in Raw Milk-Suspected E. Coli Outbreak

An outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 linked to raw milk has sickened 13 Missouri residents and led to the hospitalization of two children.

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The Missouri Department of Health confirmed that the number of outbreak victims has expanded from the 5 victims previously reported, with cases now in Boone, Camden, Clark, Cooper, Howard, Jackson and Randolph counties. One of the two children hospitalized with HUS – a severe complication of an E. coli infection that leads to kidney failure – remains in the hospital, according to St. Louis Today.

While 6 of those sickened report purchasing raw milk from the same dairy farm, state health officials say they don’t have enough evidence to definitively name the source of contamination.

Seven of the 13 cases have matching pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. Five of those with matching PFGE patterns reported drinking raw milk from the same farm. One of those is a 2-year-old child with HUS.

However, a 17-month-old child with HUS has a different PFGE pattern.

Cases linked to the outbreak were first reported in late March.

Symptoms of E. coli infection begin anywhere from 1 to 10 days after infection and include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and in rare cases fever. If you think you may have contracted an E. coli infection, contact your healthcare provider.

© Food Safety News
  • RaDonna Fox

    I would like to say that there is the belief that it is possible to keep the E. coli out of milk “if it is done right.” As a former owner of dairy goats, keeping the poo completely out of the milk long term is impossible, ever for the most well intentioned. It is BEST to simply not take the risk and don’t drink any milk or juice that is unpasteurized! The risks outweigh the benefits – by far! Thank you.

  • Sara

    Raw milk may or may not be the source, but isn’t it interesting how Oprah gets sued just for saying she won’t eat beef and this publication (and Bill Marler) can bad-mouth raw milk all you want with libel. If authorities aren’t ready to name raw milk as the source, perhaps you should wait as well and show respect to both the farm in question and the authorities investigating.