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380,000 Pounds of Diced Bacon Recalled

After U.S. food-safety authorities found evidence of Listeria contamination and refused entry to a shipment of diced bacon from Canada, a subsequent investigation prompted the Ontario-based manufacturer to call back other shipments.

Aliments Prince is recalling approximately 380,000 pounds of diced bacon products that may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced late Friday.

In its news release, FSIS said a sample of Aliments Prince’s cooked dice bacon tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes on Juy 19. U.S. regulators turned away that lot at the border.

That sparked  an “in-depth investigation … into the root causes of the problem”  by the company and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, resulting in the recall of precooked diced bacon produced by Aliments Prince prior to August 10.  The products being recalled were shipped to distribution centers in the U.S., bound for further distribution to food service institutions. 

FSIS said it has received no reports of illnesses associated with the precooked diced bacon. 

The products being recalled are: 

10-lb. shipping container with two 5-lb. packages of “Napoli Cooked Bacon Topping,” case code 83600

10-lb. shipping container with two 5-lb. packages of “Stefano Brand Cooked Diced Bacon,” case code 83601

10-lb. shipping container with two 5-lb. packages of “Bellissimo Cooked Diced Bacon,” case code 83602

10-lb. shipping container with two 5-lb. packages of “Olymel Cooked Diced Bacon,” case code 83603

10-lb. shipping container with two 5-lb. packages of “Assoluti Cooked Diced Bacon,” case code 83608

The labels on the shipping containers are marked “EST No. 169A” and “Product of Canada.” 

Consumers with questions about the recall can call Aliments Prince, S.E.C. at 1-800-361-5800. 

© Food Safety News
  • This recall is of interest, especially in light of the Canadian government’s announcement last week that it will be removing federal meat inspectors in 100+ plants in three provinces, leaving industry to essentially monitor itself. This is a recipe for disaster in combination with the country’s poor track record for protecting whistleblowers who try to raise concerns that affect public safety. For more about the reduction in food oversight and whistleblower rights in Canada, check out the Government Accountability Project’s Food Integrity Campaign blog: http://is.gd/qpGZM4