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Del Monte Recalls Cantaloupes for Salmonella

In  a year when everything from alfalfa sprouts to chicken soup, and from eggs to black pepper and a lot more were recalled for Salmonella contamination, there is still time to add cantaloupes to the list.

Del Monte Fresh Produce N.A. Inc. Thursday said it was recalling certain cantaloupes grown and shipped from Arizona for distribution in the Detroit area. 

In a statement, Del Monte Fresh said the recalled cantaloupes “have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.”

The bad cants were discovered through random testing by the Michigan Department of Agriculture.  No illnesses have yet been associated with the recall.

An estimated 81 cartons of cantaloupes, each containing 15 cantaloupes per carton, were distributed beginning Oct. 11 to wholesalers in Detroit who in turn sold them to other wholesalers and/or to retail and foodservice outlets.

The cantaloupes have a light brown color skin on the exterior; with orange flesh.  Each cantaloupe has a Del Monte® sticker with the words “Cantaloupe USA”. 

The cantaloupes were distributed for sale in bulk cardboard cartons.  The recalled cartons of cantaloupes are dark brown cardboard with the “Del Monte” logo in red lettering and “cantaloupes” in yellow lettering on a green background. 

The cantaloupes have the lot codes W-11-147-43-size 15 or W-11-14-19 size 15.

Consumers who believe they are in possession of uneaten cantaloupe affected by this recall may contact Del Monte Fresh at any time by calling 1-800-659-6500 or email Del Monte Fresh at Contact-US-Executive-Office@freshdelmonte.com.

Salmonella can cause a variety of symptoms, including fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, and vomiting and abdominal pain. 

In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in more severe illnesses and potentially can be fatal if untreated.

© Food Safety News
  • Gina Liberti

    Notice that we are, once again, looking at contamination from an industrial farming system. When these systems get big, it is difficult to control sanitation–this has been illustrated again, and again. These types of problems occur much less in the organic industry…