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Ontario Olive Oil Importer on Probation

Toronto’s LIF Foods Inc. cannot import or export the next two years, and will not be able to sell any olive oil during the period as well.

The Ontario Court of Justice imposed those conditions when it put LIF Foods on probation for two years in addition to imposing fines on the company totaling $50,000.

The penalties were for violations of Canada’s Food and Drugs Act.

LIF Foods was fined  $15,000 for unlawfully importing a quantity of their brand, Porta Villa, labeled as extra virgin olive oil. It was determined to be blended oil, containing approximately 50 percent sunflower oil, which is contrary to section 6(1)(a) of the Food and Drugs Act.

The company was also fined $35,000 for unlawfully selling a quantity of their brand, Porta Villa, labeled as extra virgin olive oil, that was in fact blended oil, containing approximately 50 percent sunflower oil. This is contrary to section 5(1) of the Food and Drugs Act, which prohibits the sale of a product to be conducted in a false and misleading manner.

LIF Foods Inc. was also placed on probation for two years, and is prohibited from importing, exporting, and selling olive oil until April 27, 2012.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is responsible for enforcing a number of acts and regulations including the Food and Drugs Act, which is intended to protect consumers from the marketing of products that do not meet prescribed standards.

© Food Safety News
  • oliveoilguy

    Fantastic news. The Canadians stand above the rest in olive oil fraud. Begs the question though. If the fraudulent oils were imported, then who is being held responisible in the country of its origin? My guess is no-one. And theres the root of the evil.

  • Polarmetrics is developing an easy to use instrument that can detect adulteration of olive oils. This problem will only get worse unless the supply chain is checked by suppliers and customers.
    John B.