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FSIS Sampling Finds E. coli in NY Beef

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has found E. coli O157 contamination in the beef at a Bay Shore, NY processing company.

As a result, Crown I Enterprises Inc. has opted to recall approximately 3,700 pounds of ground beef products because of contamination with the potentially deadly pathogen.

As defined by USDA, it is a Class 1, High Health Risk recall.

The products subject to recall include:

-24, 8-ounce burgers in 12-pound boxes of “W.B. STOCKYARD KEEP REFRIGERATED, BURGER FRESH, WB HOME STYLE OZ.”

-32, 6-ounce burgers in 12-pound boxes of “W.B. STOCKYARD, KEEP REFRIGERATED, BURGER FRESH 6 OZ.”

-48, 4-ounce burgers in 12-pound boxes of “W.B. STOCKYARD KEEP REFRIGERATED, BURGER FRESH, 4 OZ.”


-10- and 20-pound boxes of “W.B. STOCKYARD, KEEP REFRIGERATED, BEEF GROUND 80/20.”

Each package bears establishment number “EST. 20889” inside the USDA mark of inspection as well the Julian dates of “10164” and “10166.” These ground beef products were produced on June 11, 2010, and June 15, 2010, and were shipped to food service institutions in the northeast states of Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York.

The problem was discovered through FSIS microbiological sampling which confirmed a positive result for E. coli O157:H7.  FSIS and the company have received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact a physician.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers (including restaurants) of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause bloody diarrhea, dehydration, and in the most severe cases, kidney failure. The very young, seniors, and persons with weak immune systems are the most susceptible to foodborne illness.

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